K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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From the education reference

North Carolina thinking skills
Model of thinking skills adopted by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction in 1994. Lists seven levels of thinking skills from simplest to most complex: knowledge, organizing, applying, analyzing, generating, integrating, and evaluating.
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction administers the policies adopted by the State Board of Education and offers instructional, financial, technological, and personnel support to all public school systems in the state.

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A women's college
In North Carolina in the New South, page 4.3
The State Normal and Industrial School, founded in 1891, was the first public institution of higher education in North Carolina to admit women. It was established primarily to train teachers for the state's public schools. Today it is the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
Format: article
Weatherspoon Art Museum
Education programs at the museum allow students to explore the modern and contemporary paintings, sculpture, photographs and other works of art housed there.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Postcard showing the State Normal and Industrial College, Greensboro, N.C.
Postcard showing the  State Normal and Industrial College, Greensboro, N.C.
This postcard from a student at the State Normal and Industrial College (now the University of North Carolina at Greensboro) reads: Shall write as soon as I have time. Have not heard from examinations yet -- am well and hungry -- Mary...
Format: image/ephemera
Henry Frye
In Recent North Carolina, page 2.5
Biography of Henry Frye (1932–), former Chief Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court.
Format: biography
Key industries: Banking and finance
In Recent North Carolina, page 3.3
An overview of the history of the banking industry in North Carolina.
Format: article
The aftermath of Martin Luther King's assassination
In Postwar North Carolina, page 6.9
Reactions in Durham ranged from violent to peaceful after civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr., was murdered in Memphis on April 4, 1968.
Format: article
A timeline of North Carolina colleges (1766–1861)
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.12
Brief information about the more than thirty private colleges established in North Carolina before the Civil War.
Format: timeline
North Carolina in the New South
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the decades after the Civil War (1870–1900). Topics include changes in agriculture, the growth of cities and industry, the experiences of farmers and mill workers, education, cultural changes, politics and political activism, and the Wilmington Race Riot.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Early childhood
In Postwar North Carolina, page 9.1
First part of an oral history interview with Rebecca Clark, an African American who was born in rural Orange County just before the Depression and witnessed the changes in civil rights over the years.
Format: interview
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kristin Post.
The Speaker Ban controversy
In Postwar North Carolina, page 6.4
Resolution by the student legislature at UNC-Chapel Hill, 1966, against tbe state ban on campus speakers with ties to communisim. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Immigration from Africa
In Recent North Carolina, page 6.7
North Carolina today is home to people from well over a hundred nations. This article summarizes the various communities of African immigrants living in Guilford County who are listed by the U.S. Census as being simply African American.
Format: article
Postwar North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the postwar era (1945–1975).
Format: book (multiple pages)
Teaching in the ELA classroom: Best practices, lessons learned
LEARN NC will publish a series of best practice articles with a particular focus on writing, reading, and literacy at the secondary level. These web-based articles will annotate classroom activities and success stories highlighted with multi-media elements...
A timeline of North Carolina colleges and universities, 1865–1900
In North Carolina in the New South, page 4.1
Timeline of colleges and universities founded in North Carolina between the end of the Civil War and the turn of the twentieth century.
Format: timeline
By Jill Molloy.
Time travelers: Using ChronoZoom to teach historical understanding
LEARN NC was recently awarded a contract by Microsoft Research to build an interactive teaching companion to their new online tool called ChronoZoom. As a visualization tool, ChronoZoom allows students to see big history—that...
Life on a North Carolina military base in wartime
Students will use primary sources from a World War II military base in North Carolina to make inferences about life on that base. This lesson was created through a partnership with the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Laina Stapleton.
Key industries: Furniture
In Recent North Carolina, page 3.5
The traditional North Carolina furniture industry has been experiencing drastic changes in the past decade. This article gives an overview of the industry's history and current state in North Carolina.
Format: article
Wanted: Picketers
In Postwar North Carolina, page 5.4
Advertisement for picketers in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 1960, to protest discrimination by local businesses. The flyer outlines reasons for picketing and rules for nonviolent protest. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: advertisement/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Student life at the Normal and Industrial School
In North Carolina in the New South, page 4.4
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 9.6
Excerpt from the student handbook of the North Carolina State Normal and Industrial School, 1901. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Sit-ins
In Postwar North Carolina, page 5.2
On February 1, 1960, four African American students in Greensboro, North Carolina, took whites-only seats at a department store lunch counter. Their nonviolent protest launched a nationwide movement of "sit-ins" to fight Jim Crow laws.
Format: book