K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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The Kirk-Holden War
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 10.5
In response to Ku Klux Klan violence during Reconstruction, North Carolina Governor William Woods Holden declared martial law in Alamance and Caswell counties in 1870. The militia, led by former Union Col. George W. Kirk, rounded up Klan leaders in what opponents called the "Kirk-Holden War."
Format: article
Recent North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore recent North Carolina (1975–present). Topics include politics, the economy, the environment, natural disasters, and increasing diversity.
Format: book (multiple pages)
4-H on the home front
In this lesson plan, secondary students will analyze a variety of primary source textual materials to investigate how young rural people were encouraged to support the war effort during World War II.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 and 11–12 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
"The Southern Cross"
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 1.9
George Tucker's adaptation of the Star Spangled Banner to the Confederate cause. Includes historical commentary.
Format: music/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The Southern Cross (song sheet)
The Southern Cross (song sheet)
This poem, written by George Tucker, is patterned after "The Star-Spangled Banner" and is an attempt to adapt it to the Confederate cause. First published in The Southern Literary Messenger (March, 1861), it was soon printed in broadside form...
Format: image
Governor Holden speaks out against the Ku Klux Klan
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 10.4
Speech by North Carolina Governor William Woods Holden to the General Assembly, December 1869, asking for the power to declare martial law where needed to stop the violence of the Ku Klux Klan. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Running the blockade
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.3
Confederate spy Belle Boyd's tale of running the Union blockade from Wilmington, North Carolina. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
The war on terror and the presidency of George W. Bush
In Recent North Carolina, page 1.6
A brief history of the United States in the first decade of the 21st century, largely focusing on the events of September 11, 2001, and their aftermath.
Format: book
Fort Dobbs and the French and Indian War in North Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 8.2
During the French and Indian War (1754–1763), North Carolina settlers fought the Cherokee, sent troops to fight in the North, and built Fort Dobbs in Rowan County to defend the frontier.
Format: article
Vance's proclamation against deserters
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 5.12
North Carolina Governor Zebulon Vance's proclamation announcing punishments for deserters from the Confederate army and for anyone harboring them, May 1863. Includes historical commentary.
Format: proclamation/primary source
From proslavery to secession
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 7.1
Between 1830 and 1860, as abolitionism grew in the North, southerners largely stopped questioning the wisdom of slavery and argued strongly for extending it.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
J. Allen Kirk on the Wilmington Race Riot
In North Carolina in the New South, page 8.6
Account of the Wilmington Race Riot by the Rev. Dr. J. Allen Kirk, pastor of the Central Baptist Church. Kirk and his family hid in a graveyard from the white mob, then fled the city. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: pamphlet/primary source
"Liberty to slaves": The black response
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.4
During the American Revolution, some black people living in the colonies fought for the British and some fought for the revolutionaries. Their actions during the war were often decided by what they believed would best help them throw off the shackles of slavery. Most believed that victory by the British would bring an end to their enslavement.
Format: article
By Jeffrey J. Crow.
Christoph von Graffenried's account of the Tuscarora War
In Colonial North Carolina, page 3.7
Account of the beginnings of the Tuscarora War in North Carolina between settlers and Indians. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
The rise of the Ku Klux Klan
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 10.3
Contemporary description of Klan violence in the Carolinas during Reconstruction, written by African American lawyer John Patterson Green. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
The science and technology of World War II
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 5.3
For all the role of science, mathematics, and new inventions in earlier wars, no war had as profound an effect on the technologies of our current lives than World War II. And no war was as profoundly affected by science, math, and technology than World War II. This article looks at some of the key technologies developed.
Format: article
By Dr. David Mindell.
The life of a Civil War soldier
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 5.1
Article describes the food, equipment, camp life, drill, and discipline of soldiers in the U.S. Civil War. Includes video of a Civil War reenactment.
Format: article
Something he couldn't write about: Telling my Daddy's story of Vietnam
In Postwar North Carolina, page 7.3
A personal history of growing up the daughter of a Vietnam veteran and of coming to terms with the war and its legacy.
Format: essay
By Sharon Raynor.
Rutherford Trace
In 1776, during the War for Independence, an expedition led by Griffith Rutherford sought to eliminate the Cherokee as a British ally and to punish them for attacking white settlements. In one month, Rutherford’s men left dozens of Cherokee villages in ruins with hundreds of acres of crops destroyed and livestock killed or seized. Residents of western North Carolina still tell multiple sides of the story.
Format: article
Reclaiming sacred ground: How Princeville is recovering from the flood of 1999
In Recent North Carolina, page 5.13
Before Hurricane Floyd, the rest of the state and the nation knew little about Princeville and its legacy. The drama of the flood changed that; everybody seems to be asking about the old black town now. Cemeteries always have stories to tell. They speak the...
Format: article
By Victor E. Blue.