K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

ATTENTION USERS

LEARN NC is no longer supported by the UNC School of Education and has been permanently archived. On February 1st, 2018, you will only be able to access these resources through the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. We recommend that you print or download resources you may need before February 1st, 2018, after which, you will have to follow these instructions in order to access those resources.

From the education reference

North Carolina thinking skills
Model of thinking skills adopted by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction in 1994. Lists seven levels of thinking skills from simplest to most complex: knowledge, organizing, applying, analyzing, generating, integrating, and evaluating.
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction administers the policies adopted by the State Board of Education and offers instructional, financial, technological, and personnel support to all public school systems in the state.

Didn't find what you were looking for?

A library at Western Carolina University
A library at Western Carolina University
This is a library at Western Carolina University. WCU is located in Cullowhee, North Carolina, in Jackson County. It serves approximately 11,000 students of all types, ages, and international backgrounds throughout the course of a year. It has become better...
Format: image/photograph
Western Carolina University Mountain Heritage Center
The Museum provides exhibitions and programs that illustrate many of the complex issues and concerns of Appalachia's diverse people and cultures. Students discover how history relates to their own lives as they explore the many themes relevant to western North Carolina's past, present, and future.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Downtown Sylva in Jackson County, NC
Downtown Sylva in Jackson County, NC
This is downtown Sylva, North Carolina, as seen from near the courthouse. Sylva is the seat of Jackson County. It is located near Western Carolina University and is a popular destination for students of the university.
Format: image/photograph
Pleading for corn
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.6
Letter from Emma A. Scoolbred of Haywood County, North Carolina, to Colonel Joseph Cathey, asking him for an ox and corn because food has become scarce. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
William Richardson Davie (1756–1820)
William Richardson Davie was a prominent North Carolina lawyer, delegate to the Constitutional Convention, governor, and founder of the University of North Carolina.
Format: biography
Railroads in Western North Carolina
In North Carolina in the New South, page 2.6
In the nineteenth century, Asheville, a crossroads for agriculture, became a destination for tourists, loggers, and miners. New railroads meet the needs of all these groups.
Format: article
A timeline of North Carolina colleges and universities, 1865–1900
In North Carolina in the New South, page 4.1
Timeline of colleges and universities founded in North Carolina between the end of the Civil War and the turn of the twentieth century.
Format: timeline
By Jill Molloy.
Population growth and movement in 19th century North Carolina
In North Carolina maps, page 2.7
In this lesson, students explore the movement of populations during the 19th century with focus on major growth in industry and transportation by using atlas maps from the period and other resources. Students analyze reasons for migration and city growth and present these reasons through use of technology.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Jennifer Job.
The Craft Revival and economic change
In this lesson plan, originally published on the Craft Revival website, students will interpret photographs and artifacts as representations of western North Carolina’s economy at the turn of the century. They will also analyze historical census data and produce a visual web that will represent the changing nature of the economy of western North Carolina.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Social Studies)
By Patrick Velde.
The Walton War
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 1.6
Poor and inaccurate surveying led to border disputes between North Carolina and its neighbors. In December 1804, a battle was fought over an area claimed by both North Carolina and Georgia.
Format: article
The Home Guard
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.10
Letter from a commander of North Carolina's Civil War Home Guard to Governor Zebulon Vance, explaining the chaos in the western part of the state and his efforts to keep order and asking the governor for assistance. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
"My dear I ha'n't forgot you"
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.1
Letter from Elizabeth Watson to her husband, James, a Confederate solider in the Civil War, telling him news from home and how much she misses him. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Slavery across North Carolina
In this lesson, students read excerpts from slave narratives to gain an understanding of how slavery developed in each region of North Carolina and how regional differences created a variety of slave experiences.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Dayna Durbin Gleaves.
"I am sorry to tell that some of our brave boys has got killed"
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 5.13
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 3.4
Letter written from Confederate soldier M. W. Parris to his wife, Jane, during the Civil War. He writes about the fighting and the men who have been killed or wounded. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Elisha Mitchell and his mountain
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 7.4
Elisha Mitchell, a professor at the University of North Carolina, demonstrated that the mountain in the Black Mountain range that now bears his name was the tallest in eastern North America. Thomas Clingman disagreed, and the two men waged a battle in newspapers. After Mitchell's death, the U.S. Geological Survey confirmed his discovery.
Format: article
North Carolina place names
In Intrigue of the Past, page 4.8
This lesson contrasts and compares the names that Native Americans living in North Carolina gave to their villages and places with the names that European and other settlers gave to theirs.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 and 8 Social Studies)
Stoneman's Raid
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 7.6
Letter describing the effect of Stoneman's Raid on Caldwell County, North Carolina. In March 1865, at the end of the Civil War, Union General George Stoneman led 6,000 men from Tennessee into western North Carolina and southwestern Virginia, destroying railroads, factories, and warehouses. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
North Carolina State University
In North Carolina in the New South, page 4.2
North Carolina State University was founded in 1887 as the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, a land-grant institution that would provide teaching, research and extension services to the people of the state. This article gives a brief history of the school from its founding to the present day.
Format: article
North Carolina in the New Nation
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the early national period (1790–1836). Topics include the development of state government and political parties, agriculture, the Great Revival, education, the gold rush, the growth of slavery, Cherokee Removal, and battles over internal improvements and reform.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Changing communities: Past vs. future
In this lesson, students will learn about the geographical, political, and technological issues that have influenced change in mountain communities using oral histories by Madison County residents. They will learn about the history of road building in the North Carolina mountains and the relatively recent decision to connect two halves of interstate highway in Madison County. They will compare and contrast the negative and positive changes that road construction has brought to the region, and listen to oral histories of locals who have experienced both good and bad effects.
Format: lesson plan