K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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From the education reference

No Child Left Behind
No Child Left Behind is a 2001 federal law placing requirements on state schools in four broad areas: increased accountability, implementing research-based instructional strategies, increasing parental options, and expanding local control in schools. Specific goals include 100% student proficiency on state achievement tests by 2013–2014 and "highly qualified" teachers in every classroom.

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Child labor in North Carolina's textile mills
The photographs of Lewis Hine show the lives and work of children in North Carolina's textile mill villages in the first decades of the twentieth century.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)
Child labor in the cotton mills
The resources on this page are designed to help educators teach about what life was like for children working in the cotton mills of North Carolina in the early 20th century. Through these lessons, students will learn about child labor by listening to the oral histories of people who worked in these cotton mills as children.
Format: lesson plan
Persuasive writing: The importance of work permits
In CareerStart lessons: Grade eight, page 1.5
In this lesson, students will read about child labor laws and work permits, and will write a persuasive paper based on what they've learned.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts)
By Andrea Fedon, Gail Frank, and Cindy Neininger.
Ending child labor in North Carolina
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 2.1
The movement to ban child labor began in the early 1900s and slowly turned the tide of public opinion. As mill work changed in the 1920s, mills employed fewer children. North Carolina finally regulated child labor in 1933.
Format: article
The Fair Labor Standards Act
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 2.4
The Fair Labor Standards Act, signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on June 25, 1938, revolutionized the federal government's oversight of industry. Although it directly impacted only about a quarter of American workers, in affected industries, it banned oppressive child labor, limited the workweek to 44 hours, and established a minimum wage of 25 cents an hour.
Format: article
"Card" Specialty
Students will make a greeting card for their pen pals or book buddies while studying specialization and division of labor in Social Studies.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–5 Social Studies)
By Pat Pennino.
A child's day: Vietnam
In this lesson plan, students listen to audio recordings from Vietnam and discuss what life may be like for the children heard in the recordings. Students discuss topics including school, cross-cultural similarities, and child labor.
Format: lesson plan (grade 7 Social Studies)
By Kristin Post.
Child labor
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 7.1
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 7.7
Slideshow Lewis Hine, photographer for the National Child Labor Committee, documented child labor across...
Format: article
Charlie and Ollie Allen, child laborers
Charlie and Ollie Allen, child laborers
Charlie and Ollie Allen had been working at the Harriet Cotton Mills for two years when this picture of them was taken. They are standing in front of their clapboard home while a younger child stands on the porch above them. There is trash in the yard and...
Format: image/photograph
Child labor laws in North Carolina
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 2.2
Excerpt of North Carolina's 1933 law regulating child labor. Includes historical background.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Sarah Crutcher, 12-year-old girl herding cattle
Sarah Crutcher, 12-year-old girl herding cattle
Twelve year old Sarah Crutcher sits astride a horse and herds cattle for her father, S.O. Crutcher, in Lawton, Oklahoma. The photographer wrote, "She was out of school (#49 Comanche County) only 2 weeks this year and that was to herd 100 head of cattle for...
Format: image/photograph
Caring for children
In Rice farming and rural life in Vietnam, page 20
Throughout Southeast Asia, but especially in highland farming areas, children of both sexes are considered precious and vulnerable. Adults and teens of both sexes and all ages generally enjoy caring for young children. They find it an amusing and relaxing...
By Lorraine Aragon.
Doffers in Trenton Mills, Gastonia, N.C.
Doffers in Trenton Mills, Gastonia, N.C.
Four young boys called doffers can be seen pushing bins full of bobbins of thread through a textile mill in this photograph taken in 1908. Doffers replaced the full bobbins with empty ones in the spinning area of the mill. The sepia photograph shows the spinning...
Format: image/photograph
Little girls work in the interior of a tobacco shed
Little girls work in the interior of a tobacco shed
Child laborers were hired for many types of jobs. In this photograph, little girls, ages eight, nine, and ten work in a tobacco barn. Sunlight is streaming in through large cracks between the wooden planks of the walls. They are standing in back of wooden...
Format: image/photograph
Herschel Bonham cultivating peas on a farm
Herschel Bonham cultivating peas on a farm
Herschel Bonham, wearing a long sleeved shirt and overalls, can be seen plowing behind a light colored horse in this photograph from Lawton, Oklahoma in the spring of 1917. He is cultivating peas on a farm. The photographer wrote that the eleven-year-old boy...
Format: image/photograph
One of the smallest doffers at Cherryville Manufacturing Company
One of the smallest doffers at Cherryville Manufacturing Company
One of the smallest children, a doffer, at the Cherryville Manufacturing Company can be seen in this photograph. He is wearing shorts and is barefoot and appears to be polishing a wooden stand which holds some of the spinning machinery. A young girl wearing...
Format: image/photograph
Nannie Coleson, looper, at a textile mill in Scotland, Neck, N.C.
Nannie Coleson, looper, at a textile mill in Scotland, Neck, N.C.
Eleven year old Nannie Colson can be seen working as a looper at the Crescent Hosiery Mill in Scotland Neck, North Carolina. Sitting in a chair in front of a hosiery machine, she is absorbed in her work. She is so short that she is at eye-level with the machine....
Format: image/photograph
Two young spinners in Catawba Cotton Mills.
Two young spinners in Catawba Cotton Mills.
In this sepia photograph taken in December of 1908, a young girl with her hair pulled back is seen standing at a spinning machine in a textile mill.There is cotton lint on the wooden floor boards under the machines. Two women can be seen working at the spinning...
Format: image/photograph
Mrs. Zora Jarvis, Wilkes County, N.C.
Mrs. Zora Jarvis, Wilkes County, N.C.
Mrs. Zora Jarvis and a small child are pictured seated on a couch.
Format: image/photograph
Mrs. L.L. Oakley, Wilkes County, N.C.
Mrs. L.L. Oakley, Wilkes County, N.C.
Mrs. L.L. Oakley is shown sitting in front of the fireplace with another woman, a child, and a baby.
Format: image/photograph