K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

Living with the bomb
In Postwar North Carolina, page 1.4
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 8.8
After the Soviet Union tested its first atomic bomb in 1948, the U.S. Government produced civil defense films explaining the true nature of atomic bombs and demonstrating techniques for surviving an atomic attack. This article includes two civil defense films, film of the first hydrogen bomb test, and a Life magazine article about a honeymoon in a bomb shelter.
Format: exhibit
By David Walbert.
War on the Outer Banks
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 3.2
Article describes action along the coast of North Carolina during the Burnside Expedition, 1862.
Format: article
Fort Branch - Confederate Earthen Fort
Recognized by the state of North Carolina as a regional historic site, Fort Branch at Rainbow Banks was the cornerstone of the entire Roanoke Valley's defense during the Civil War.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Postwar North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the postwar era (1945–1975).
Format: book (multiple pages)
A union organizer blames the mill
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 8.4
Article printed by the Gastonia Daily Gazette during the Loray Mill strike in 1929, one of the few printed that represented the views of the strikers. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Desegregating hospitals
In Postwar North Carolina, page 5.7
Interiew with a black dentist who joined a 1963 lawsuit against the Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital in Greensboro for refusing to accept African American patients or to hire African American doctors. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
African Americans get the vote in eastern North Carolina
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.9
After the Civil War, African American communities in eastern North Carolina, having already tasted freedom during the war, were ready to fight for political rights.
Format: article
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina as a Civil War battlefield: May 1861-April 1862
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 2.4
Summary of military operations in North Carolina in the first year of the Civil War, including Burnside's Expedition against the coast.
Format: article
The Japanese-American Internment
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 7.4
Announcement of the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II and orders to Japanese Americans in San Francisco. Includes historical commentary.
Format: poster/primary source
Fort Macon State Park
This area of undisturbed natural beauty is the perfect place to explore salt marshes and estuaries vital to the coastal ecosystem. Students can also visit the fort to learn about its historical significance to North Carolina.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Civil War casualties
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.12
Historians estimate that about 620,000 Americans died in the Civil War -- almost as many as have died in all other U.S. wars combined. This article explains why.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
The Burnside Expedition
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 3.1
Union General Ambrose Burnside led an assault on Roanoke Island in February 1862. Burnside's forces would take and hold much of the coast of North Carolina for the remainder of the war.
Format: article
The Thomas Legion
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.10
The "Thomas Legion" of North Carolina Cherokees fought with the Confederate army from 1862 to 1865.
Format: article
The Greensboro killings
In Postwar North Carolina, page 8.8
An anti-Ku Klux Klan rally in Greensboro, North Carolina, in November 1979, resulted in the deaths of five people at the hands of self-proclaimed Klansmen and Nazis. The accused men were never convicted.
Format: article
Wilmington, Fort Fisher, and the lifeline of the Confederacy
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 7.4
By the fall of 1864, Wilimington, North Carolina, protected by Fort Fisher, was the last major Confederate port still open. Ships running the Union blockade brought supplies to the port, which were then carried to armies in Virginia via the Wilmington & Weldon Railroad. When Fort Fisher fell to Union forces in January 1865, Wilmington soon followed.
Format: article
The Raleigh Standard protests conscription
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.2
Newspaper editorial protesting the expansion of conscription by the Confederate government in January 1864. Includes historical commentary and background on conscription in the Civil War.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Process
In Intellectual Freedom Toolkit, page 1
The Initial Complaint The Informal Reconsideration Process The Formal Reconsideration Process The Committee Process The...
Format: article
By Will Cross and Kimberly Hirsh.
Rose O'Neal Greenhow, Confederate spy
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 5.5
Letter from Rose O'Neal Greenhow to President Jefferson Davis about the preparations taken by Confederate generals to defend Charleston from a Union attack. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Organization of Civil War armies
Article describes the levels of organization of northern and southern armies and the officers who commanded at each level.
Format: article