K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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"Card" Specialty
Students will make a greeting card for their pen pals or book buddies while studying specialization and division of labor in Social Studies.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–5 Social Studies)
By Pat Pennino.
A union organizer blames the mill
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 8.4
Article printed by the Gastonia Daily Gazette during the Loray Mill strike in 1929, one of the few printed that represented the views of the strikers. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Career skill: Writing expressions and equations
In CareerStart lessons: Grade seven, page 2.9
In this lesson for grade seven, students will translate between natural language sentences and mathematical equations. Students will discuss how this skill may be useful in various careers.
Format: lesson plan (grade 7 Mathematics)
By Peggy Dickey and Barbara Turner.Adapted by Sharon Abell.
Estimated cost of the North Carolina Rail Road, 1851
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 5.3
In this activity, students analyze an account of the cost of building the North Carolina Railroad in the 1850s and evaluate how much it cost in "today's dollars."
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Rosie the Riveter
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 7.5
With men needed in the armed forces during World War II, women took over jobs traditionally reserved for men, including heavy industrial work. Includes a recording of the song "Rosie the Riveter."
Format: article
Henry Ford and the Model T
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 1.9
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 8.4
Short biography of Henry Ford explains how he revolutionized manufacturing by using a continuous moving assembly line. Includes a film from the Henry Ford Estate showing how the Model T worked.
Format: article
Working in a tobacco factory
In North Carolina in the New South, page 3.2
Newspaper interview with a woman who worked for the Duke tobacco company rolling cigarettes in the 1880s. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Workplace safety
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 2.3
Excerpt of legislation passed by the North Carolina General Assembly in 1933 to protect the health and safety of industrial workers. Includes historical background.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The Great Migration and North Carolina
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.5
During the Jim Crow era of the early twentieth century, more than a million African Americans left the South for northern cities, where they took advantage of economic opportunities and created thriving communities.
Format: article
By Shepherd W. McKinley and Cynthia Risser McKinley.
The Battle of the Bulge
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 5.9
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 8.7
Oral history interview with a North Carolina World War II veteran about his experiences in the Battle of the Bulge, fought in France between December 1944 and January 1945. Includes historical background and contemporary newsreel footage.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The United States and World War I
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.2
Article summarizes the reasons for U.S. involvement in World War I, President Wilson's role in the peace talks, and the nation's return to isolationism after the war, including the "Red Scare." A sidebar summarizes North Carolina's contributions.
Format: article
North Carolinians debate secession
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 1.4
Quotations from North Carolinians supporting and opposing secession in 1860–61. Includes historical commentary.
Format: document/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Catherine Edmondston and Reconstruction
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.7
Excerpts from the diary of Catherine Edmonston of Halifax County, North Carolina, 1865–66, in which she describes her frustration with emancipation and her family's attempts to control its former slaves. Includes historical commentary. Note: This source contains explicit language or content that requires mature discussion.
Format: diary/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The Reed Gold Mine
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 6.2
A brief history of Cabarrus County farmer John Reed and his gold mine, from the first discovery of gold in 1799 to the establishment of a valuable and productive mine.
Format: book
Alice Caudle talks about mill work
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 7.5
WPA Federal Writers Project interview with a North Carolia woman about her life and work in textile mills in the early twentieth century. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The Live at Home Program
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 2.7
The Live At Home program, established during the Great Depression, helped North Carolinians to grow food to support themselves and to sell surplus food at local farmers markets. This 1936 report includes historical background and commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The invention of the telegraph
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 5.1
After Samuel Morse developed a means of transmitting messages using electricity in the 1830s, it took several years for the technology to become commercially practical. The first telegraph wires, between Baltimore and Washington, were strung in the 1840s.
Format: article
Diary of a journey of Moravians
In Colonial North Carolina, page 5.3
In 1733, a group of Moravians -- a Protestant Christian denomination originating in fourteenth-century Bohemia -- moved from Europe to North America seeking freedom from religious persecution. In 1753, a group of twelve single brothers left Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, for a new settlement in North Carolina. These excerpts from their diary show the difficulties they faced on their journey. Includes historical commentary.
Format: diary/primary source
The woman at the wheel
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 1.10
Magazine article from 1915 predicting that technological improvements in automobiles would make them easier for women to drive and, therefore, more popular. The author praises the effect the car will have on dispersing population. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: magazine/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Africans before captivity
In Colonial North Carolina, page 4.1
Most Africans who came to North America were from West Africa and West Central Africa. This article describes some of the cultures and history of those regions prior to the beginning of the slave trade.
Format: article