K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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National Institute of Environmental Health
Tour the National institute of Environmental Health campus in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina and learn about environmental health as well as career options for those who are interested in going into the field of biomedical research.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Two worlds: Educator's guide
Lesson plans and activities to be used with "Two Worlds: Prehistory, Contact, and the Lost Colony" -- the first part of a North Carolina history textbook for secondary students.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Understanding the Columbian Exchange
In Two worlds: Educator's guide, page 5.1
This lesson will help students think about the effects of the Columbian Exchange, particularly the exchange of disease as it affected the psychology of the Europeans and Native populations in the early settlement of the Americas.
Format: lesson plan (grade 7–8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Apprehending plant killers
In CSI Dublin: The Hunt for the Irish Potato Killer, page 5
In this lesson, students research a plant pathogen of their choice and create a wanted poster.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Science)
By Rebecca Hite.
Tracking a potato killer: Using latitude and longitude to map the spread of P. infestans
In CSI Dublin: The Hunt for the Irish Potato Killer, page 1
Students use latitude and longitude to follow the transmission of the plant pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of the Irish Potato Famine.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 English Language Arts and Science)
By Rebecca Hite.
Disease and catastrophe
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 5.3
Of all the kinds of life exchanged when the Old and New Worlds met, lowly germs had the greatest impact. Europeans and later Africans brought smallpox and a host of other diseases with them to America, where those diseases killed as much as 90 percent of the native population of two continents. Europeans came away lucky -- with only a few tropical diseases from Africa and, probably, syphilis from the New World. In America, disease destoyed civilizations.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Microbiology: Bacteria in our environment
In CareerStart lessons: Grade eight, page 5.5
In this lesson, students will learn about bacterial cells and will participate in a lab measuring the growth of bacterial colonies.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Science)
By Tammy Johnson and Martha Tedrow.
Profiling a potato killer
In CSI Dublin: The Hunt for the Irish Potato Killer, page 3
In this lesson, students use internet resources to determine the factors behind the potato blight that led to the most destructive famine in human history. Students will use the scientific method and inquiry to determine how the pathogen spread over the world and learn some of the historical context surrounding this tragedy.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Science)
By Rebecca Hite.
Isolating a potato killer
In CSI Dublin: The Hunt for the Irish Potato Killer, page 2
In this lesson, students use Koch's postulates to demonstrate the causal relationship between microbe and disease by transmitting Phytophthora infestans from an infected potato tuber to a healthy potato specimen.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Science)
By Rebecca Hite.
Identifying a potato killer via PCR and gel electrophoresis
In CSI Dublin: The Hunt for the Irish Potato Killer, page 4
In this lesson, students use DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction, and gel electrophoresis techniques to identify positive and negative leaf samples for the presence of the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Science)
By Rebecca Hite.

Resources on the web

What's my hypothesis?
In this Science NetLinks lesson, students explore how descriptive epidemiological clues can be used to make educated guesses as to what might be the cause of a disease. (Learn more)
Format: lesson plan (grade 6–8 Science)
Provided by: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Born for strokes
In this Science Update, from Science NetLinks, students hear about a recent study that suggests that malnutrition in the womb can come back to haunt you well into adulthood. (Learn more)
Format: activity/lesson plan (grade 9–12 Science)
Provided by: American Association for the Advancement of Science