K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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"Land and Work in Carolina" teaching strategies
A variety of suggested activities for use with an article that explains the key elements of feudalism, with a focus on how those elements evolved into the systems of labor and land ownership seen in colonial North Carolina.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Land and work in Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.10
This article explains the key elements of feudalism, including its hierarchy of personal relationships and system of landholding, and how those elements evolved into the systems of labor and land ownership seen in colonial North Carolina.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Martin Luther's Reformation in Hugo's The Hunchback of Notre Dame
The setting of Victor Hugo's novel, The Hunchback of Notre Dame is the fifteenth century, the transitional period between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance/Reformation era. This era ushers in the period known as the modern age and historical events are chronicled through Hugo's novel. Hugo sets The Hunchback of Notre Dame at the decline of feudalism and the infancy of absolutism through Louis XI (Spider King), the rise of a urban middle class and the beginnings of commerce as it is known today. Primarily this novel satirizes the Catholic Church's absolute power -- its abuses, and its excesses. Students will discover how Hugo's satire operates to show the Catholic Church's abuse of power during the late Middle Ages and the early Reformation in The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Nancy Webber.
The French Revolution: "Those who have and those who have not"
This lesson is part of the French Revolution unit that examines the reigns of the absolute monarchs and the monetary crisis of the French government.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9 Social Studies)
By Kevin Huntley.
The Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina (1669)
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.9
The lengthy and complicated plan devised by the Lords Proprietors for the government of Carolina would have established a feudal system of elaborate courts, manors, and serfs. Includes historical commentary.
Format: constitution/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
The Charter of Carolina (1663)
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.4
In the Charter of Carolina, King Charles II of England granted the eight men known as the Lords Proprietors rights to the land that became North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: charter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.