K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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LEARN NC is no longer supported by the UNC School of Education and has been permanently archived. On February 1st, 2018, you will only be able to access these resources through the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. We recommend that you print or download resources you may need before February 1st, 2018, after which, you will have to follow these instructions in order to access those resources.

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McCulloch Gold Mill
Take a trip to the McCulloch Gold Mill and learn the history and geology of the Triad area. Students will love panning for gold and gemstones!
Format: article/field trip opportunity
The North Carolina Gold Rush
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 6.1
Gold was discovered in Cabarrus County, North Carolina, in 1799, and within a few years, the North Carolina Gold Rush was on. Men arrived in the Piedmont to work in the mines, many of them from Cornwall in England.
Format: article
By Rebecca Lewis.
Historic Bost Grist Mill
This working grist mill will transport students back to the 1800s and shows how people lived and worked in that time. Originally powered by water, the mill is operated by tractor with a belt and pulley today.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Will of Richard Blackledge, Craven County, 1776
In Colonial North Carolina, page 7.8
Will of a wealthy plantation owner in colonial North Carolina. Includes explanations and photographs of items listed.
Format: will/primary source
The Great Depression: An overview
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 1.1
An overview of the economic causes of the Great Depression and why it grew from a downturn into a catastrophe.
Format: article
The workings of a gold mine
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 6.5
Article from Harper's Weekly magazine, 1857, tells the story of workers in a North Carolina Gold Mine.
Format: article/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
"The mill don't need him tonight"
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 3.3
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 5.4
WPA interview with a Durham, North Carolina, girl about her family's experiences during the Great Depression. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Field trips in context
Opportunities abound in North Carolina for hands-on interdisciplinary learning experiences.
Format: article
By Lesley Richardson.
"No one has anything to sell"
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.8
Diary of Julia Johnson Fisher, a Georgia woman, in March and April 1864, in which she describes the difficulty finding food and other necessities during the Civil War. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
"Eastern North Carolina for the farmer"
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 6.3
Pamphlet published by the Atlantic Coast Line railroad in 1916, advertising eastern North Carolina as a place for people from other parts of the country to settle. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
"Begging reduced to a system"
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 3.4
WPA life history of a North Carolina family living on welfare during the Great Depression. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The impending crisis of the South
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 7.8
Excerpt from Hinton Helper's 1857 book arguing against slavery on the grounds that it kept the South subservient to the North and hurt poor whites. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
The Buncombe Turnpike
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 7.6
The Buncombe Turnpike began in the early nineteenth century as the Drover's Road through western North Carolina, used to drive livestock to market. The Turnpike brought trade and increased prosperity to the region and especially to Asheville. After the Civil War, economic recession and the rise of railroads led to its decline.
Format: article