K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

ATTENTION USERS

LEARN NC is no longer supported by the UNC School of Education and has been permanently archived. On February 1st, 2018, you will only be able to access these resources through the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. We recommend that you print or download resources you may need before February 1st, 2018, after which, you will have to follow these instructions in order to access those resources.

Election 2012
Educational resources to help students and teachers understand the 2012 elections.
Format: (multiple pages)
Election 2008
Educational resources to help students and teachers understand the 2008 elections.
Format: (multiple pages)
Martin Luther King, Jr. Online Visitor Information Center
Maintained by the National Park Service this web page is useful for anyone planning a trip to the King historic site in Atlanta, GA or interested in the life of the civil rights leader.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Revolutionary North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the era of the American Revolution. Topics include the Regulators, the resistance to Great Britain, the War for Indpendence, and the creation of new governments.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Where English and history meet: A collaboration guide
Strategically plan a collaborative unit and learn how to overcome those everyday obstacles that prevent success. This guide is accompanied by four lesson plans to help you put collaboration into practice.
Format: series (multiple pages)
Paired writing: Hoover and FDR
Taking on the persona of FDR and Hoover, students will write responses to citizens seeking help with real world problems.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Social Studies)
By Angie Panel Holthausen.
War bonds
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 7.10
The United States Government spent some $300 billion during World War II -- more than $4 trillion in today's money. Most of that money had to be borrowed. To finance the war, the government issued savings bonds.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
North Carolina Executive Mansion
A history with images of the governor's mansion in Raleigh, North Carolina. Explore the gardens, the library, the ballroom, and more...all online. Read a brief history of NC's current first family.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
The Great Depression and World War II
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the Great Depression and World War II (1929–1945).
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New Nation
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the early national period (1790–1836). Topics include the development of state government and political parties, agriculture, the Great Revival, education, the gold rush, the growth of slavery, Cherokee Removal, and battles over internal improvements and reform.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Mobilizing for war
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 4.6
The U.S. entry into World War II required rapid and massive buildup of the armed forces and industrial production to supply the war effort. this page includes a clip from a documentary produced by the U.S. Government in 1942 showing scenes of wartime production.
Format: documentary
Wilkes County Heritage Museum
The Old Wilkes County Courthouse is now a museum which showcases the rich history of this county.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
The U.S. Constitution
On September 17, 1787, thirty-nine of the fifty-five delegates to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia signed the Constitution of the United States of America. Since 2005, Constitution Day has been officially celebrated every September 17. This collection of resources offers many different ways to teach about the Constitution and its impact on students' lives.
Format: bibliography/help
Community and Government
This sampling of instructional resources will help students from elementary through high school learn about their communities, the federal, state, and local governments, and how to be responsible and effective citizens.
Format: bibliography/help
The North Carolina Oath of Allegiance
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 1.8
Form that new soldiers, politicians, and civil servants had to fill out and sign after North Carolina's secession, by which they pledged loyalty to the state and renounced their loyalty to the United States.
Format: document/primary source
The economics of recovery and reform
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 1.8
Timeline of events, federal programs, and economic trends, 1933–1940, leading to the U.S. recovery from the Great Depression.
Format: timeline
Lesson plans on the web
In Election 2008, page 3.1
A collection of resources and activities for students and teachers that focus on the 2008 election as well as the election process.
Format: bibliography
North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina during the Civil War and Reconstruction (1860–1876). Topics include debates over secession, battles and strategies, the war in North Carolina, the soldier's experience, the home front, freedom and civil rights for former slaves, Reconstruction, and the "redemption" of the state by conservatives.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the early 20th century
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the first decades of the twentieth century (1900–1929). Topics include changes in technology and transportation, Progressive Era reforms, World War I, women's suffrage, Jim Crow and African American life, the cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and labor unrest, and the Gastonia stirke of 1929.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Declaration of Independence
In Where English and history meet: A collaboration guide, page 5
In this interdisciplinary lesson, students will examine the role of the Declaration of Independence in the development of the American Revolution and as part of the American identity. They will also analyze the argumentative structure and write their own declaration.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Karen Cobb Carroll, Ph.D., NBCT.