K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Our Idea of Nothing at All
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.7
Poem by by Alice Duer Miller attacking a U.S. Senator from North Carolina who opposed women's suffrage. Includes historical commentary.
Format: poetry/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
"Be saved from the jaws of an angry hell"
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 3.7
An 1831 letter from Thomas Whitmell Harriss to his sister, in which he begs her to accept Christ as her savior. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
"The difference is about our land": Cherokees and Catawbas
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 4.1
During the American Revolution, American Indians living in North Carolina had to choose whether to support England or the colonists. While different groups of Indians made different decisions, most made their choices based on how they thought they could best protect their lands.
Format: article
By Jim L. Sumner.
Governor Aycock on "the negro problem"
In North Carolina in the New South, page 8.9
Speech by North Carolina Governor Charles Brantley Aycock, 1903, in which Aycock proclaims both the absolute supremacy of the white race and the importance of education for all citizens. Includes historical commentary.
Format: speech/primary source
Edmund Fanning reports to Governor Tryon
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 1.5
Letter from Edmund Fanning to Governor William Tryon, April 23, 1768, reporting on the activities of the Regulators. Shows how the Regulators were seen by colonial leaders. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
A father's advice to his sons
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 2.3
Letter from Charles Pettigrew, Tyrrell County minister and planter, to his sons. Believing himself to be dying, Pettigrew gave them his advice for living a good and Christian life. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
A bilious fever
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 2.9
Excerpt from an 1850 novel in which the author describes the illness he succumbed to on a trip to Nag's Head. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
James Curry escapes from slavery
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 3.12
Excerpt from the memoir of James Curry, former slave in North Carolina, describing his escape to the North and plans to move to Canada. Includes historical commentary. Note: This source contains explicit language or content that requires mature discussion.
Format: essay/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Women's clubs
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 2.2
Excerpt from the published minutes of the North Carolina Federation of Women's Clubs, a statewide organization that coordinated the activities of various clubs. Includes historical commentary on women's activities as reformers during the Progressive Era.
Format: document/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Freed people at New Bern
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.5
Excerpt from the report of Vincent Colyer, Superintendent of the Poor for Union-occupied North Carolina during the Civil War, about his work with freedmen and escaped slaves. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood and David Walbert.
Canova's statue of Washington
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 4.8
In 1815, at a time when the state of North Carolina was unwilling to spend money on roads or schools, the General Assembly spent as much as $60,000 on a statue of George Washington for the State Capitol.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Pauline S. Johnson.
A Dialect Dictionary of Lumbee English
In Teaching about North Carolina American Indians, page 2.2
Originally published as a booklet by the North Carolina Language and Life Project at NC State University, this page provides a brief explanation of Lumbee English as well as a dictionary of terms and definitions from the Lumbee English dialect.
Format: article
By Clare J. Dannenberg, Hayes A. Locklear, Natalie Schilling-Estes, and Dr. Walt Wolfram.
Debating the Federal Constitution
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 6.5
Excerpt of a speech given by William Richardson Davie at the convention called in North Carolina, 1788, to consider ratification of the United States Constitution. Davie explains why the new Constitution is necessary and why it is not a threat to liberty and argues for ratification. Includes historical commentary.
Format: speech/primary source
Selected excerpts from Frederick Douglass slave narrative
Frederick Douglass was born into slavery on Maryland's Eastern Shore in 1818. He escaped from slavery at age 20 and became an active figure in the abolitionist movement, eventually becoming one of the most important black American figures of the 19th century. In these excerpts from his first autobiography, he describes his experiences as a slave.
Format: book/primary source
Selected excerpts from Harriet Jacobs slave narrative
Harriet Jacobs was born in Edenton, North Carolina, in 1813. As a young woman she ran away from her master, hiding out in a crawl space above a storeroom in her grandmother’s house for seven years. In 1842, she escaped to the North and lived as a fugitive while she worked to reunite herself with her two children. In these excerpts from her memoir, she describes her childhood, her years in the crawl space, her escape to the North, and her experiences as a free woman.
Format: book/primary source