K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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From the education reference

differential reinforcement techniques
Interventions other than punishment that a teacher uses when a student consistently behaves inappropriately in the classroom. These include differential reinforcement of low rates of behavior (DRL), differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO), and differential reinforcement of incompatible behavior (DRI).

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Inquiry-based exploration of human impacts on stream ecosystems: The Mud Creek case study
This unit plan for high school earth and environmental science explores the impact of human activity on the health of streams in urban and non-urban settings. Students mimic current scientific research by measuring physical, chemical, and biological indicators of stream health.
Format: (multiple pages)
Measuring turbidity
In this video, Christine Muth of the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics demonstrates how to measure turbidity, the lack of clarity of a sample of water.
Format: video/demonstration
Measuring pH
In this video, Christine Muth of the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics demonstrates how to measure pH of a water sample using two types of pH paper.
Format: video/demonstration
Chemical indicators of stream health
In Inquiry-based exploration of human impacts on stream ecosystems: The Mud Creek case study, page 5.1
Chemical attributes of a body of water help determine the number and diversity of organisms that it can support. Scientists measure a variety of chemical parameters to assess stream health, including pH, dissolved oxygen, total dissolved solids, turbidity,...
Format: article/classroom content
Measuring total dissolved solids
In this video, Christine Muth of the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics demonstrates how to measure the total dissolved solids of a water sample using a Vernier conductivity probe.
Format: video/demonstration
Fundamental concepts: Introduction
In Intrigue of the Past, page 1.1
British archaeologist Stuart Piggott once called archaeology “the science of rubbish.” There is truth to his statement. Archaeologists spend lifetimes investigating the abandoned remains of ancient societies.
What happens to plant cells in hypertonic and hypotonic solutions?
Students will be using actual laboratory examples and classroom examples to understand the movement of molecules across the cell membrane. Looking at weight change in potato cells, color change in diffusion, and the shrinking of living tissue will allow the student to experience diffusion and osmosis.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Science)
By Tricia Kershner.
Forensic scientists: Identifying unknown substances
In CareerStart lessons: Grade eight, page 5.10
In this lesson, students use the physical properties of three mystery substances to determine their identities. Students discuss how these skills apply to careers in forensic science.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Science)
By Tammy Johnson and Martha Tedrow.
Isolating a potato killer
In CSI Dublin: The Hunt for the Irish Potato Killer, page 2
In this lesson, students use Koch's postulates to demonstrate the causal relationship between microbe and disease by transmitting Phytophthora infestans from an infected potato tuber to a healthy potato specimen.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Science)
By Rebecca Hite.
Measuring dissolved oxygen
In this video, Christine Muth of the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics demonstrates how to measure the level of dissolved oxygen in a water sample using a LaMotte test kit.
Format: video/demonstration
Soil and erosion unit: Section 2
This unit will involve descriptive information on North Carolina soil types and how the presence of plants affects soil erosion. This section should be begun only after completion of Soil and erosion unit: Section 1.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Science)
By Amy Robertson.
Archaeology as a career
In Intrigue of the Past, page 5.2
In their study of archaeology as a career, students will read essays and complete an activity to gain an understanding of and appreciation for the career of a professional archaeologist.
Format: lesson plan (grade K–5 Guidance)
Identifying a potato killer via PCR and gel electrophoresis
In CSI Dublin: The Hunt for the Irish Potato Killer, page 4
In this lesson, students use DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction, and gel electrophoresis techniques to identify positive and negative leaf samples for the presence of the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Science)
By Rebecca Hite.
The science and technology of World War II
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 5.3
For all the role of science, mathematics, and new inventions in earlier wars, no war had as profound an effect on the technologies of our current lives than World War II. And no war was as profoundly affected by science, math, and technology than World War II. This article looks at some of the key technologies developed.
Format: article
By Dr. David Mindell.
Inclusion in the 21st-century classroom: Differentiating with technology
In Reaching every learner: Differentiating instruction in theory and practice, page 7
While most teachers recognize the need to differentiate instruction, many face barriers in implementation. These barriers include lack of time to prepare lessons, the need to cover a wide range of content in a small amount of time, and extensive classroom management needs. This article advocates for using technology as a means to overcome some of these barriers.
Format: article/best practice
By Bobby Hobgood, Ed.D. and Lauren Ormsby.

Resources on the web

Mona Lisa's smile
In this Science Update, from Science NetLinks, students hear about how the Mona Lisa's smile appears to change depending on where on her face you look. (Learn more)
Format: activity/lesson plan (grade 6–8 Visual Arts Education and Science)
Provided by: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Genetics Science Learning Center
Learn how to extract DNA from any living thing and find out about DNA, stem cells, genetic disorders, and gene therapy. (Learn more)
Format: website/general
Provided by: University of Utah