K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Chatham County farmers protest
In North Carolina in the New South, page 7.4
Petition from the Chatham County Farmers Alliance to the North Carolina General Assembly, 1889, asking for legislation protecting the interests of farmers. Includes historical commentary.
Format: petition/primary source
North Carolina's first public school opens
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.5
Announcement of the opening of the first free public school in North Carolina, 1840. Includes historical commentary about the North Carolina Public School Act of 1839.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Lesson plans
In LGBTQIA Resources for Educators, page 3.2
Here you will find links to lesson plans on LGBTQIA topics.
Format: article
By Summer Pennell.
Ballot measures
In Election 2012, page 2.11
Resources pertaining to any measures on the ballot, details of previous ballot measures and an explanation of the process.
Format: bibliography
Lyndon Johnson and the Great Society
In Postwar North Carolina, page 6.1
An overview of President Lyndon Johnson's "Great Society" programs, which addressed poverty, transportation safety, urban development, and health.
Format: article
Postwar North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the postwar era (1945–1975).
Format: book (multiple pages)
Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Amending the U.S. Constitution
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.8
Text of the thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth amendments to the U.S. Constitution, passed after the Civil War to abolish slavery and to guarantee the civil rights of African Americans.
Format: constitution/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Dorothea Dix Hospital
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.7
Dorothea Dix, a reformer from New England, came to North Carolina in the 1840s to campaign for a state mental hospital that would provide humane care to the mentally ill. Her efforts resulted in the construction of Dix Hill Asylum (now called Dorothea Dix Hospital) which opened in 1856.
Format: article
The Constitution of the United States: Amendments 11-27
Amendment XI Passed by Congress March 4, 1794. Ratified February 7, 1795. The Judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against...
Format: constitution
President Johnson signs Medicare bill
President Johnson signs Medicare bill
President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the Medicare bill at the Harry S. Truman Library in Independence, Missouri, with former President Harry S. Truman looking on. In the background, from left to right, are Senator Edward V. Long, an unidentified man, Lady Bird...
Format: image/photograph
Black codes, 1866
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.6
Excerpts of legislation passed by the North Carolina General Assembly after the Civil War to limit the freedoms of former slaves. Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood and David Walbert.
The Indian Removal Act of 1830
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 10.5
Act of Congress, passed in 1830, authorizing President Andrew Jackson to transfer Eastern Indian tribes to the territories west of the Mississippi River. Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kathryn Walbert, L. Maren Wood, and David Walbert.
Tobacco bag stringing: Educator's guide
Elementary lesson plans Elementary lesson plans based upon Tobacco Bag Stringing: Life and Labor in the Depression will help students understand what tobacco bag stringing was, study primary source documents and visuals,...
Format: lesson plan
The 1971 constitution
In Postwar North Carolina, page 8.3
North Carolina's constitution was rewritten in 1971 to incorporate the many amendments made since Reconstruction.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
The Lumbee: Who are they?
In Teaching about North Carolina American Indians, page 2.6
Introduction This activity for middle school grades allows students to survey the various theories concerning the ancestry of the Lumbee. Students will read and analyze four threads that seek to chronicle the ancestry of North Carolina’s largest...
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Gazelia Carter.
Ending child labor in North Carolina
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 2.1
The movement to ban child labor began in the early 1900s and slowly turned the tide of public opinion. As mill work changed in the 1920s, mills employed fewer children. North Carolina finally regulated child labor in 1933.
Format: article
The North Carolina Equal Suffrage League
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.5
Report of the statewide organization working to obtain voting rights for women, 1917. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Regulating hog farms
In Recent North Carolina, page 4.5
Newspaper article about efforts by North Carolina legislators in 1995 to regulate large hog farms and the waste they produce. Includes historical background.
Format: article/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
A Bill to Prevent All Persons from Teaching Slaves to Read or Write, the Use of Figures Excepted (1830)
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.9
Law enacted by the North Carolina General Assembly, 1830. Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.