K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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The battle begins
The battle begins
In a reenactment of the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, Continental soldiers watch while British troops fire at American militia. The militia were ordered to fire twice, then break formation. Since militia were not professional soldiers, how well they obeyed...
Format: image/photograph
Overmountain Man statue at Sycamore Shoals
Overmountain Man statue at Sycamore Shoals
This statue of a Patriot militiaman stands at Sycamore Shoals State Park in Tennessee, site of a militia muster prior to the Battle of King's Mountain.
Format: image/photograph
Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail
This historic trail, part of the National Trails System, tracks the route of Patriot militia men to the Battle of Kings Mountain.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
David Fanning and the Tory War of 1781
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 5.10
During the American Revolution, Patriots and Loyalists fought in the North Carolina backcountry. In 1781, David Fanning, commanding the Loyalist forces of five counties, terrorized residents of the Piedmont.
Format: article
Running for cover
Running for cover
Continental soldiers watch as American militia retreat for cover in the woods in a reenactment of the Battle of Guilford Courthouse.
Format: image/photograph
The Kirk-Holden War
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 10.5
In response to Ku Klux Klan violence during Reconstruction, North Carolina Governor William Woods Holden declared martial law in Alamance and Caswell counties in 1870. The militia, led by former Union Col. George W. Kirk, rounded up Klan leaders in what opponents called the "Kirk-Holden War."
Format: article
The Regulators
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 1.1
In the 1760s residents of the North Carolina Piedmont protested high taxes, illegal fees, and corrupt officials. These protesters, who came to be known as the Regulators, began with civil disobedience and ended in violence at the Battle of Alamance in 1771.
Format: article
Songs of the Regulators
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 1.7
Lyrics to songs making fun of lawyers and colonial leaders who got rich at the expense of small farmers. Includes historical commentary.
Format: poetry
The Battle of Kings Mountain
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 5.3
At the Battle of King's Mountain, fought in October 1780 in South Carolina, Patriot militias defeated Loyalists under the command of a British Army officer.
Revolutionary North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the era of the American Revolution. Topics include the Regulators, the resistance to Great Britain, the War for Indpendence, and the creation of new governments.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Governor Holden speaks out against the Ku Klux Klan
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 10.4
Speech by North Carolina Governor William Woods Holden to the General Assembly, December 1869, asking for the power to declare martial law where needed to stop the violence of the Ku Klux Klan. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
The Battle of Guilford Courthouse
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 5.9
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 7.2
During the American Revolution, on March 15, 1781, American and British armies met at Guilford Courthouse, in present-day Greensboro, North Carolina. Although the British won the battle, they lost so many troops that the battle ultimately helped the American cause. Includes a slideshow of photographs from a 2008 reenactment.
Format: article
An authentick relation of the Battle of Alamance
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 1.11
Contemporary newspaper account of the Battle of Alamance, fought between Regulators and militia led by Governor William Tryon on May 16, 1771. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
The Bill of Rights
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 6.7
The text of the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution, with historical commentary.
Format: constitution/primary source
Nat Turner's Rebellion
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 9.1
In 1831, Nat Turner, an enslaved man in Southampton, Virginia, led an insurrection in which a small band of slaves and free African Americans killed fifty-five whites. After the revolt, white militias and mobs hunted down blacks suspected of taking part in this or other insurrections, and southern states passed harsh new laws restricting the freedoms of both slaves and free blacks.
Format: article
By L. Maren Wood and David Walbert.
Chaos in Salem
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 5.6
Excerpt from diaries of the Moravian congregation at Salem, North Carolina, in 1781, describing the Moravians' treatment by Patriot militias. Includes historical commentary.
Format: diary/primary source
"George, hide thy face and mourn"
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 5.8
Before the Battle of Guilford Courthouse in 1781, Continental Army General Nathaniel Greene stopped in Salisbury and was inspired by the aid and sacrifice of a woman who owned a tavern. This version of the story was told in the 1840s. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
The Rutherford Expedition
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 4.3
The Cherokee, hoping to protect their lands from white settlement, sided with Britain in the American Revolution. In 1776, responding to Cherokee attacks, General Griffith Rutherford led an expedition against the Cherokee, taking slaves, burning villages, and destroying crops and food stores.
Format: article
The Walton War
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 1.6
Poor and inaccurate surveying led to border disputes between North Carolina and its neighbors. In December 1804, a battle was fought over an area claimed by both North Carolina and Georgia.
Format: article
Taking aim
Taking aim
Having forced the militia to retreat, British soliders ("Redcoats") take aim at the first line of Continental troops in a reenactment of the Battle of Guilford Courthouse.
Format: image/photograph