K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Blue Ridge Paper Mill Tours
The Blue Ridge Paper Mill is one of the oldest paper mills in the United States and has tours of the facility by appointment only.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Blue Ridge Paper Mill in Canton, North Carolina
Blue Ridge Paper Mill in Canton, North Carolina
This is the Blue Ridge Paper Mill in Canton, North Carolina. It is one of the oldest paper mills in the country and is one of the best-paying employers in the region. The mill has been under fire for many years for the level of pollutants that it contributes...
Format: image/photograph
An industry representative visits Loray Mills
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 8.3
Article from the Charlotte Observer during the Loray Mill strike in Gastonia, 1929. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Canton Area Historical Museum
Students will learn about the beginnings of this western North Carolina town, it's history, and the industry that sustains it.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Industrialization in North Carolina
In North Carolina in the New South, page 2.3
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 2.7
Industrialization needed five things -- capital, labor, raw materials, markets, and transportation -- and in the 1870s, North Carolina had all of them. This article explains the process of industrialization in North Carolina, with maps of factory and railroad growth.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Children at work: Exposing child labor in the cotton mills of the Carolinas
In this lesson, students will learn about the use of child labor in the cotton mills of the Carolinas during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. They will learn what life was like for a child worker and then write an investigative news report exposing the practice of child labor in the mills, using quotations from oral histories with former child mill workers and photographs of child laborers taken by social reform photographer Lewis Hine.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Social Studies)
By Dayna Durbin Gleaves.
4-H club contributions to the war effort
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.7
This page includes three reports sent by county agents of the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service after the war ended. Each county agent outlined the contributions of 4-H club members in his or her county to the war effort. Includes historical commentary.
Format: report/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Civil War uniforms
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 5.3
Article describes the clothing and baggage of northern and southern soldiers during the U.S. Civil War. Includes video of a Civil War reenactment.
Format: article
Weaving picture books into narrative writing
Children's picture books are the perfect medium for mini-lessons in narrative writing. Teachers provide books which demonstrate the qualities the students need to develop in their own writing.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 English Language Arts)
By Jan Caldwell.
Small-town businesses, 1903
In North Carolina in the New South, page 2.10
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 9.5
Excerpts from The North Carolina Year Book and Business Directory, 1903, for the towns of Jefferson and Washington. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Will of Richard Blackledge, Craven County, 1776
In Colonial North Carolina, page 7.8
Will of a wealthy plantation owner in colonial North Carolina. Includes explanations and photographs of items listed.
Format: will/primary source
Growth and transformation: The United States in the Gilded Age
In North Carolina in the New South, page 2.1
Between the Civil War and the First World War, industry and cities grew at a tremendous pace in the United States.
Format: article
Cooleemee's Textile Heritage Center
This historic center was built so that the people of the Carolina mill industry would not be forgotten. The center celebrates and strives to preserve their values and their way of life to share with future generations.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
J. Allen Kirk on the Wilmington Race Riot
In North Carolina in the New South, page 8.6
Account of the Wilmington Race Riot by the Rev. Dr. J. Allen Kirk, pastor of the Central Baptist Church. Kirk and his family hid in a graveyard from the white mob, then fled the city. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: pamphlet/primary source
Evaluating woody biomass options for North Carolina's electricity future
In this high-school lesson, students learn about the pros and cons of co-firing woody biomass fuels with coal to produce electricity.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts, Science, and Social Studies)
By Dana Haine.
"No one has anything to sell"
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.8
Diary of Julia Johnson Fisher, a Georgia woman, in March and April 1864, in which she describes the difficulty finding food and other necessities during the Civil War. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
The Belk brothers' department stores
In North Carolina in the New South, page 2.12
When Henry and John Belk opened their first department store in Charlotte in 1895, the idea of buying everything under one roof -- and always for cash, not store credit -- was new to consumers. This excerpt from the history of Belk, Inc., tells the story of Henry Belk, his first store in Monroe, and the Belk Bros. stores in downtown Charlotte.
Format: book
The impending crisis of the South
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 7.8
Excerpt from Hinton Helper's 1857 book arguing against slavery on the grounds that it kept the South subservient to the North and hurt poor whites. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Ashe County deserters
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.11
Speech by North Carolina Governor Thomas W. Bickett in Ashe County, 1918, convincing deserters to turn themselves in and return to service in the Army. Bickett explains his view of the rationale for the war and of citizens' duty to their country. Includes historical commentary.
Format: article/primary source

Resources on the web

Paper production
This Science NetLinks lesson is designed to help students understand how processes and jobs in developed countries have changed over time due to technology and mass production. (Learn more)
Format: lesson plan (grade 2 Science)
Provided by: American Association for the Advancement of Science