K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Civil rights protests and dilemmas
In this lesson students explore well-known civil rights protests then listen to two oral histories of individuals who protested in their own way to promote equality for African Americans. Students specifically will consider personal risks involved in protest.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Anti-war demonstrations
In Postwar North Carolina, page 7.9
Although the anti-war protests of the 1960s and 1970s are remembered today mainly as something young people participated in, people aged 18 to 29 actually were more likely to support the war than their elders, and college campuses were deeply divided on the issue. Protests in cities drew people of all ages and backgrounds. This page includes video of a 1967 march on the Pentagon.
Civil rights protest chart
Used in the Civil Rights Protests and Dilemmas lesson, in this chart students fill in basic information about famous protests of the civil rights movement and rate the risk to the protesters.
Format: document
Youth protest: JoAnne Peerman
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.6
Interview with an African American woman who attended an all-black elementary school but an integrated middle school and high school. Includes historical background.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kristin Post.
The Andy Griffith Show in historical context
In this lesson plan, students review their knowledge about the 1960s in the United States and read an article about The Andy Griffith Show. Students reflect on societal fears in the 1960s and consider how those fears might have influenced the show's popularity.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Jamie Lathan.
Postwar North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the postwar era (1945–1975).
Format: book (multiple pages)
Gay rights demonstration, 1976
Gay rights demonstration, 1976
During the 1976 Democratic National Convention in New York City, a group of men marches in a demonstration for gay rights.
Format: image/photograph
Voting rights demonstration
Voting rights demonstration
Men and women in McComb, Mississippi demonstrate for voting rights in 1962. Some hold picket signs.
Format: image/photograph
The environmental justice movement
In Recent North Carolina, page 4.1
In the early 1980s, the environmental justice movement became a national protest that galvanized communities across the country seeking social justice and environmental protection. The initial environmental justice spark sprang from a protest in Warren County, North Carolina.
Format: article
Elizabeth Freeman in suffrage demonstration
Elizabeth Freeman in suffrage demonstration
Elizabeth Freeman, a women's suffrage activist, participates in a demonstration for women's voting rights.
Format: image/photograph
Little Rock, 1959. Mob marching from capitol to Central High
Little Rock, 1959. Mob marching from capitol to Central High
Photograph shows a young African American boy watching a group of people, some carrying American flags, march past to protest the admission of the "Little Rock Nine" to Central High School.
Format: image/photograph
Civil War conscription cartoon
Civil War conscription cartoon
This Civil War-era political cartoon, titled "Southern 'Volunteers'" protests conscription into the Confederate Army.
Format: image/cartoon
Duke University vigil, 1968
Duke University vigil, 1968
Duke students participate in a silent demonstration after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. During the vigil, which lasted from April 5 to April 11, 1968, "up to 1,400 students slept on the Chapel Quad, food services and housekeeping employees...
Format: image/photograph
Wanted: Picketers
In Postwar North Carolina, page 5.4
Advertisement for picketers in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 1960, to protest discrimination by local businesses. The flyer outlines reasons for picketing and rules for nonviolent protest. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: advertisement/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Florence F. Noyes in suffrage pageant
Florence F. Noyes in suffrage pageant
Classical dancer Florence Fleming Noyes, wears the costume of "Liberty" during a 1913 suffrage pageant in front of the Treasury Building in Washington, D.C. German actress Hedwig Reicher is wearing the costume of "Columbia."
Format: image/photograph
Recent North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore recent North Carolina (1975–present). Topics include politics, the economy, the environment, natural disasters, and increasing diversity.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Protest at Piedmont Leaf Tobacco Company, 1946
Protest at Piedmont Leaf Tobacco Company, 1946
Protest at Piedmont Leaf Tobacco Company, 1946. Police chief, John Gold, is at right. Striking worker Margaret DeGraffenreid is being forced into police car.
Format: image/photograph
1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom
1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom
The Library of Congress identifies the men in the forefront of this photograph as Joseph L. Rauh, Jr., Washington lawyer and civil rights activist; Whitney M. Young, Jr., executive director of the National Urban League (NUL); Roy Wilkins of the National Association...
Format: image/photograph
The Wilmington Ten
In Postwar North Carolina, page 8.2
Racial tensions and protests in Wilmington, North Carolina, led to violence in early 1971. Ten people were convicted and imprisoned, but many considered them political prisoners, and the case brought national and international attention to North Carolina.
Format: article
The Speaker Ban controversy
In Postwar North Carolina, page 6.4
Resolution by the student legislature at UNC-Chapel Hill, 1966, against tbe state ban on campus speakers with ties to communisim. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.