K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

Sea wall
Sea wall
At the Isle of Wight Centre for the Coastal Environment in the United Kingdom, a sea wall separates the ocean from the land.
Format: image/photograph
Great City
In East from India: Cambodia and Southern Vietnam, page 13
The images represent a Hindu myth of creation called the Churning of the Sea of Milk. On one side of the causeway, fifty-four guardian deities (called devas) pull the head of a mythical serpent or "naga." On the other side, fifty-four images of...
By Lorraine Aragon.
Cannon atop the battlements of Fort San Felipe
Cannon atop the battlements of Fort San Felipe
A colonial-era cannon sits atop a fort's battlements. Modern streetlights separate the fort's walls from the sea. Fort San Felipe was an integral part of Cartagena's defense from several invasions during the colonial period. Several times during the 17th and...
Format: image/photograph
Coastal erosion and the ban on hard structures
In Recent North Carolina, page 4.3
North Carolina’s sandy coast is one of the state’s greatest tourist attractions, and also one of its frequent sources of controversy. The 301 miles of coastline in the east have been the site of an ongoing struggle between stable structures created by humans and the dynamic forces of nature, between property rights and thousands of years of geology. A 1985 rule designed to preserve the beaches in their natural state enjoys the support of coastal scientists but threatens the investments of home-owners and developers.
Format: article
By Emily Jack.
Recent North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore recent North Carolina (1975–present). Topics include politics, the economy, the environment, natural disasters, and increasing diversity.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina as a Civil War battlefield: May 1861-April 1862
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 2.4
Summary of military operations in North Carolina in the first year of the Civil War, including Burnside's Expedition against the coast.
Format: article
Ubehebe Crater in Death Valley, CA
Ubehebe Crater in Death Valley, CA
The rippled walls of Ubehebe Crater in Death Valley, California. The crater was created over 300 years ago by a huge volcanic explosion caused by pent up underground steam pressure, which left a 600 foot deep depression in the earth. Hikers can circle the...
Format: image/photograph
Remembering the Revolution
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 7.3
An analysis of the painting The Apotheosis of Washington in the U.S. Capitol rotunda, and a discussion of how it reflected the values of Americans on the eve of the Civil War.
Format: article
John White searches for the colonists
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 4.6
In this excerpt from the report of his voyage, John White explains how he and the crew of two ships searched for the lost colonists on Roanoke Island but could not find them.
Format: article/primary source
The narrows at Mosaic Canyon, Death Valley, CA
The narrows at Mosaic Canyon, Death Valley, CA
Hikers in the narrows at Mosaic Canyon, Death Valley, California. The canyon was formed by water as it flowed through faults and carved away at the surrounding stone. Mosaic Canyon received its name from the appearance of a rock formation called the "Mosaic...
Format: image/photograph
The narrows at Mosaic Canyon, Death Valley, CA
The narrows at Mosaic Canyon, Death Valley, CA
A hiker in the sculpted narrows at Mosaic Canyon, Death Valley, California. The canyon was formed by water as it flowed through faults and carved away at the surrounding stone. Mosaic Canyon received its name from the appearance of a rock formation called...
Format: image/photograph
Stone stele at Prambanan shows fish removing stones from Rama's bridge to Lanka
Stone stele at Prambanan shows fish removing stones from Rama's bridge to Lanka
A stone stele from the Ramayana wall carvings at Prambanan Temple shows fish and other sea creatures removing stones from Rama's bridge to Lanka. Large fish and serpents, all carved with large overlapping heads facing to the left, are depicted carrying the...
Format: image/photograph
Mythic statues line causeway to south gate of Angkor Thom or Great City
Mythic statues line causeway to south gate of Angkor Thom or Great City
Mythic statues line the causeway over a moat leading to the south gate of Angkor Thom, literally called "Great City." The images represent a Hindu myth of creation called the Churning of the Sea of Milk. On one side of the causeway, fifty-four guardian deities...
Format: image/photograph
Moving Cape Hatteras Lighthouse
In Recent North Carolina, page 4.2
Because of the threat of shoreline erosion, in 1999, the Cape Hatteras Light Station was successfully relocated 2,900 feet from the spot on which it had stood since 1870.
Format: article
When World War II was fought off North Carolina's beaches
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 7.6
In 1942, German U-boats -- submarines -- prowled the waters off North Carolina, where they sank merchant ships carrying supplies to the Allies in Europe.
Format: article
By Kevin P. Duffus.
Using coastal evidence to make management decisions
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 2.2
This lesson is part of chapter two of the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks." Students act as if they are residents of the area affected by the opening of Isabel Inlet. Depending on which group they are in, they argue for or against the closure of the inlet in a class debate.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 English Language Arts, Science, and Social Studies)
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.
Intrigue of the Past
Lesson plans and essays for teachers and students explore North Carolina's past before European contact. Designed for grades four through eight, the web edition of this book covers fundamental concepts, processes, and issues of archaeology, and describes the peoples and cultures of the Paleoindian, Archaic, Woodland, and Mississippian periods.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Canning for country and community
In this lesson plan, students will use primary source documents to evaluate the technological challenges of food preservation in the 30s and 40s, compare food preservation in the first half of the twentieth century with today, and consider the political role of food in the community.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Melissa Thibault.
The pathfinders
In Intrigue of the Past, page 3.2
An essay covering the pathfinders of the Paleoindian Period. Learn about the trek across Beringia and the lifeways of these early American Indians.
Venture Smith describes his enslavement
In Colonial North Carolina, page 4.5
Excerpt from a late eighteenth-century book by a freed slave in Connecticut. Describes his capture and enslavement at the age of six. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Shane Freeman.