K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

ATTENTION USERS

LEARN NC is no longer supported by the UNC School of Education and has been permanently archived. On February 1st, 2018, you will only be able to access these resources through the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. We recommend that you print or download resources you may need before February 1st, 2018, after which, you will have to follow these instructions in order to access those resources.

Didn't find what you were looking for?

  • Get help searching the LEARN NC website.
Reading primary sources: Newspaper advertisements
This interactive guide to reading classified advertisements in a 19th-century newspaper editorial steps through layers of questions, guiding the reader through the process of historical inquiry. This edition is one in a series of guides on reading historical primary sources.
Format: newspaper (multiple pages)
Reading primary sources: Slave narratives
This interactive guide to reading a slave narrative steps through layers of questions, guiding the reader through the process of historical inquiry. This edition is one in a series of guides on reading historical primary sources.
Format: interview (multiple pages)
Reminiscences of Levi Coffin: The story of Jack Barnes
A chapter from the memoir of Levi Coffin, a Quaker abolitionist who was heavily involved in the Underground Railroad in the 19th century.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Slavery in North Carolina
The resources on this page are designed to provide an opportunity for students to explore the history of slavery in North Carolina by reading slave narratives. Through these lessons, students will analyze the cultural background and the daily life of the authors of these narratives.
Format: lesson plan
Excerpt from William H. Robinson slave narrative
William H. Robinson was born into slavery in Wilmington, North Carolina, one of 12 siblings. After slavery ended in 1865, he worked for many years as a traveling singer and banjo player, then attended Central Tennessee College and became a minister. In this excerpt, he writes about the secret meanings of many spirituals.
Format: book
Excerpt from Fannie Dorum slave narrative
Fannie Dorum was born into slavery in Franlin, North Carolina. In this brief excerpt, she describes the work she did as a slave.
Format: book
George Washington and Frederick Douglass letters: Recognizing point of view and bias
In Where English and history meet: A collaboration guide, page 4
This lesson uses two letters written by famous individuals. Frederick Douglass, a well-known former slave who became a leader of the American abolition movement, escaped from slavery in Maryland to freedom in New York in 1838. George Washington was a large slaveholder in Virginia (as well as the first president of the United States).
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Karen Cobb Carroll, Ph.D., NBCT.
Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Long Way to Travel
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 6.5
Audio and lyrics of an African American spiritual. Includes historical commentary.
Format: music/primary source
Death of an Old Carriage Horse
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 6.11
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 9.4
Poem by George Moses Horton. Includes historical and literary commentary.
Format: poetry/primary source
By George Moses Horton.
Excerpt from Thomas Johnson slave narrative
Thomas Johnson was born as a slave in Virginia. After slavery was ended in 1865, he became a minister and traveled to Africa and England to convert others to Christianity. In this excerpt he describes the risk that slaves had to take to meet in prayer groups and sing hymns and spirituals. Johnson mentions the Jubilee Singers, a group of black musicians who performed spirituals in concerts around America and Europe after the Civil War.
Format: book
Slave songs
In this lesson, students learn more about the religious observances of slaves in the United States by presenting hymns from Slave Songs in the US digitized in the Documenting the American South Collection. This is a great lesson to introduce the intersection of religion and slavery in a US history or African American history class.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Meghan Mcglinn.
The Compromise of 1850
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 7.4
The Compromise of 1850, passed by Congress after the Mexican War, temporarily appeased both northerners and southerners who debated the expansion of slavery.
Format: article
Mapping rumors of Nat Turner's Rebellion
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 9.2
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 6.2
Introduction to a series of primary sources about Nat Turner's Rebellion and the responses to it in North Carolina, including rumors of further slave insurrections and retaliation against African Americans allegedly involved. This page provides maps showing the locations of key events, the distribution of slaves in North Carolina, and the location of roads along which news would have traveled.
Format: activity
I'm Gwine Home on de Mornin' Train
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 6.4
Audio and lyrics of an African American spiritual. Includes historical commentary.
Format: music/primary source
African American spirituals
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 6.2
Excerpt from Frederick Douglass' autobiography in which he describes the purpose and effect of spirituals for enslaved people. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Interracial "harmony" and the Great Awakening
The students will be introduced to two episodes in 19th-century American history, around the time of the Great Awakening, that show glimpses of some positive and negative consequences of interracial interaction in a religious context. The students will examine primary sources from the Documenting the American South collection to then be able to write a "sermon" from the perspective of a southern itinerant preacher during the Great Awakening arguing for or against religion as a cure for the social ill of racism and slavery.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Jamie Lathan.
The Gospel Train
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 6.3
Audio and lyrics of an African American spiritual. Includes historical commentary.
Format: music/primary source
The transformation of cacao into chocolate
Transforming cacao into chocolate is a labor-intensive process that involves many steps. This slideshow tells the story of that process, focusing on one cacao plantation in the Barlovento region of Venezuela.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)
A Virginian responds to Dunmore's Proclamation
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.6
Response to a 1775 proclamation by the Royal Governor of Virginia offering freedom to slaves and indentured servants who agreed to serve in the king's army. The writer argues that the governor does not have slaves' best interests at heart. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source