K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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"Shew Yourselves to be Freemen"
To the inhabitants of the Province of North-Carolina. Dear Brethren, Nothing is more common than for Persons who look upon themselves to be injured than to resent and complain. These are sounded aloud,...
Format: pamphlet/primary source
The Emancipation Proclamation
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.6
Proclamation issued by President Abraham Lincoln, January 1, 1863, freeing slaves in states or parts thereof then in rebellion against the United States. Includes historical commentary.
Format: proclamation/primary source
A room at the Mendenhall Plantation in Jamestown, NC
A room at the Mendenhall Plantation in Jamestown, NC
This is a room filled with historical artifacts at the Mendenhall Plantation in Jamestown, North Carolina. During the Civil War, the home was occupied by Quakers who were dissenters. They supported and helped escaping slaves.
Format: image/photograph
Governor Holden speaks out against the Ku Klux Klan
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 10.4
Speech by North Carolina Governor William Woods Holden to the General Assembly, December 1869, asking for the power to declare martial law where needed to stop the violence of the Ku Klux Klan. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Lunsford Lane: A slave in North Carolina who buys his freedom
In this lesson plan, students read a primary source document to learn about the life of Lunsford Lane, a slave who worked in the city of Raleigh, North Carolina. Students answer questions about Lane based on his memoir to help them understand the details of his life.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By John Schaefer and Victoria Schaefer.
The Coming Man's Presidential Career, a la Blondin
The Coming Man's Presidential Career, a la Blondin
Charles Blondin was a French-born acrobat who became famous in the late 1850s for his daring tightrope walks over Niagara Falls. He repeated the feat several times, once carrying his agent across the falls on his shoulders. Here, Lincoln is shown in the guise...
Format: image/cartoon
English Language Arts Methods: Grades 9-12 Model Lessons
In Preservice teacher education resources, page 1.5
Common Core State Standards Click here for more details on these standards. OBJECTIVE 1: Reading Literature Skills Covered: key ideas and details, craft and...
Format: article/teacher's guide
The dining room of the Bennehan House in Stagville, NC
The dining room of the Bennehan House in Stagville, NC
This is what the dining room of the Bennehan House would have looked like during the 1800s. Bennehan House is one of several remnants of the Stagville Plantation, which thrived until the Civil War.
Format: image/photograph
Enduring amputation
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 5.10
Letter from a Civil War soldier to his brother about how he is getting along with his artificial leg. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
An American hero: Harriet Tubman
In this lesson, the school librarian and classroom teacher should work together to teach students about the life of Harriet Tubman in recognition of African-American History and Cultural Heritage Month.
Format: lesson plan (grade 1 Information Skills and Social Studies)
By Floanna Long.
Historic slave quarters at Horton Grove in Stagville, NC
Historic slave quarters at Horton Grove in Stagville, NC
These are the historic slave quarters of Horton Grove Plantation in Stagville, North Carolina.
Format: image/photograph
Liberty Hall
This fully restored home built in the early 1850s shows what life was like in rural North Carolina over 150 years ago.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Teaching with primary sources
This collection of resources includes best practice articles, primary source process guides, lesson plans that model historical inquiry, and book-length materials that incorporate primary sources.
Format: bibliography/help
Outhouse exterior, Stagville Plantation
Outhouse exterior, Stagville Plantation
Exterior view of an outhouse behind the Bennehan house, the main plantation house at Stagville Plantation. Stagville plantation is located in parts of what are now Orange, Durham, Wake, and Granville counties. Established in 1787 by the Bennehan and Cameron...
Format: image/photograph
Outhouse interior, Stagville Plantation
Outhouse interior, Stagville Plantation
Interior view of an outhouse behind the Bennehan house, the main plantation house at Stagville Plantation. Stagville plantation is located in parts of what are now Orange, Durham, Wake, and Granville counties. Established in 1787 by the Bennehan and Cameron...
Format: image/photograph
I'm Gwine Home on de Mornin' Train
I'm Gwine Home on de Mornin' Train is part of the John and Ruby Lomax 1939 Southern States Recording Trip collection at the Library of Congress. John Lomax was a folklorist and musicologist who...
Format: audio/music
History of a scout
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 8.2
Account of a slave who escaped from a plantation in Jones County, North Carolina, to Union lines during the Civil War and served as a scout for the Union army. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Historic Stagville
Read about the history of the plantation, the Bennehan and Cameron families who owned the plantation, the slave community, the structures on the plantation, and the effect the Civil War had on Stagville Plantation.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Slaves escape to Union lines
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.3
Federal Writers' Project interview with former slave Mary Barbour. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
The importance of rice to North Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 6.2
Rice was a very profitable crop in the late 1600s. People in foreign lands were already familiar with it, and it was gaining popularity as a food for the growing slave trade. Rice production helped support North Carolina's economy for many years, relying largely on slave labor. The abolition of slavery marked the beginning of the end of rice plantations in North Carolina.
Format: article
By Keri Towery.