K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Bennehan House, Stagville Plantation
Bennehan House, Stagville Plantation
Exterior view of the Bennehan house at Stagville Plantation. This was the main plantation house on the property. The original 1.5-story structure is located at the right in these photos, and was built in 1787. The two-story addition at left was added in 1799....
Format: image/photograph
Historic Rosedale Plantation
Located a few miles from the center of downtown Charlotte, the Rosedale Plantation is a good representation of plantation life in Piedmont North Carolina.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Historic Latta Plantation
A living history farm 20 miles north of Charlotte features an African American exhibit, virtual tour and history of this once cotton plantation, activities for kids, and teacher resources.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Advertising for slaves
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 1.10
Advertisements for sales of slaves and for runaways in the Carolina Watchman (Salisbury, North Carolina), January 7, 1837. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Inside and outside: Paradox of the box
This lesson serves to introduce students to symbolism (the box), to the literary element paradox, and to the abstract notion of ambiguity (freedom vs. confinement). It is designed for 2nd and 3rd graders, but may be adapted for use with upper elementary or early middle school grades.
Format: lesson plan (grade 2–6 English Language Arts)
By Edie McDowell.
African American history
A guide to lesson plans, articles, and websites to help bring African American history alive in your classroom.
Format: bibliography/help
Statue in Cartagena, Colombia
Statue in Cartagena, Colombia
A statue of a man holding a long stick sits atop a stone pedestal. This statue may represent an African slave brought to Latin America. Cartagena was one of the largest ports for the arrival of slaves brought from Africa during the colonial period. While Brazil...
Format: image/photograph
"What we are in justice entitled to"
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 8.1
Jourdon Anderson, an ex- Tennessee slave, declines his former master's invitation to return as a laborer on his plantation.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
An introduction to slave narratives: Harriet Jacobs' Life of a Slave Girl
In this lesson, students will learn about the life experiences of slaves in the United States during the 1800s by reading the story of a North Carolina slave woman who eventually escaped.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Joe Hooten.
African American English
In this activity, students learn about the history of African American English and the meaning of dialect and linguistic patterns. Students watch a video about African American English and analyze the dialect's linguistic patterns.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Hannah Askin.
The North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.8
On the first of April 1899, the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company opened for business in Durham, North Carolina. The first month’s collections, after the payment of commissions, amounted only to $1.12, but from such beginnings North Carolina Mutual grew to be the largest African American managed financial institution in the United States.
Format: article
Political parties in the United States, 1788–1840
Timeline and explanation of the development of political parties in the early national period. Includes a sidebar about parties in North Carolina.
Format: article
Mountain dialect: Reading between the spoken lines
This lesson plan uses Chapter 13 of Our Southern Highlanders as a jumping-off point to help students achieve social studies and English language arts objectives while developing an appreciation of the uniqueness of regional speech patterns, the complexities of ethnographic encounter, and the need to interrogate primary sources carefully to identify potential biases and misinformation in them. Historical content includes American slavery, the turn of the century, and the Great Depression.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Kathryn Walbert.
Slave house door, Stagville Plantation
Slave house door, Stagville Plantation
Door of a slave house at Horton Grove at Historic Stagville, North Carolina. Paul Cameron ordered these slave houses to be built in 1850 in hopes of improving the health of those who had been living in poorly-constructed, leaky, dirt-floored cabins on the...
Format: image/photograph
Exterior of slave house, Stagville Plantation
Exterior of slave house, Stagville Plantation
Exterior view of a slave house at Horton Grove at Historic Stagville, North Carolina. Paul Cameron ordered these slave houses to be built in 1850 in hopes of improving the health of those who had been living in poorly-constructed, leaky, dirt-floored cabins...
Format: image/photograph
Great Barn exterior, Stagville Plantation
Great Barn exterior, Stagville Plantation
Exterior view of the Great Barn at Stagville Plantation, North Carolina. The Great Barn was built by enslaved people during the summer of 1860 and was originally used to house the plantation's mules. It is thought to be the largest agricultural building built...
Format: image/photograph
Great Barn interior, Stagville Plantation
Great Barn interior, Stagville Plantation
Interior view of the Great Barn at Stagville Plantation, North Carolina. The Great Barn was built by enslaved people during the summer of 1860 and was originally used to house the plantation's mules. It is thought to be the largest agricultural building built...
Format: image/photograph
Somerset Place (NC Historic Site)
Located on the banks of Phelps Lake, Somerset Place is a representative antebellum plantation offering a view of life during the period before the Civil War. It became one of North Carolina's most prosperous rice, corn, and wheat plantations.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Pleading for corn
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.6
Letter from Emma A. Scoolbred of Haywood County, North Carolina, to Colonel Joseph Cathey, asking him for an ox and corn because food has become scarce. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
The Foscue Plantation House
This restored plantation home has a rich history and exhibits family artifacts and period pieces.
Format: article/field trip opportunity