K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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"Liberty to slaves": The black response
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.4
During the American Revolution, some black people living in the colonies fought for the British and some fought for the revolutionaries. Their actions during the war were often decided by what they believed would best help them throw off the shackles of slavery. Most believed that victory by the British would bring an end to their enslavement.
Format: article
By Jeffrey J. Crow.
Catherine Edmondston and Reconstruction
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.7
Excerpts from the diary of Catherine Edmonston of Halifax County, North Carolina, 1865–66, in which she describes her frustration with emancipation and her family's attempts to control its former slaves. Includes historical commentary. Note: This source contains explicit language or content that requires mature discussion.
Format: diary/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
North Carolina v. Mann
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 1.3
In this 1829 court decision, Judge Thomas Ruffin established the nearly absolute power of a slaveholder over a slave. Includes historical commentary.
Format: court decision/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Teaching resources: The election process
In Election 2012, page 3.3
Resources that examine the various aspects of the American election process from contemporary and historical perspectives.
Format: bibliography
Nathaniel Macon
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 1.4
Biography of Nathaniel Macon (1758–1837), North Carolina political leader from Warren County.
Format: biography
Laws and government: Hammurabi's Code
In CareerStart lessons: Grade seven, page 4.2
In this lesson, students analyze the Code of Hammurabi and make inferences about Babylonian society based on the code. The lesson plan concludes with a discussion of contemporary careers that involve knowledge of laws.
Format: lesson plan (grade 6–7 Social Studies)
By Mary B. Taylor.
The impending crisis of the South
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 7.8
Excerpt from Hinton Helper's 1857 book arguing against slavery on the grounds that it kept the South subservient to the North and hurt poor whites. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
"Land and Work in Carolina" teaching strategies
A variety of suggested activities for use with an article that explains the key elements of feudalism, with a focus on how those elements evolved into the systems of labor and land ownership seen in colonial North Carolina.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Teaching point of view
In this lesson plans, students compare and contrast a folktale and a 1903 primary source account in order to gain an understanding of point of view.
Format: lesson plan (grade 7 English Language Arts)
By Angela Strother.
Insurrections in North Carolina?
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 9.7
Article from a Raleigh newspaper reporting alleged slave insurrections in North Carolina, and white responses to these rumors, following Nat Turner's Rebellion in 1831. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Tar Heels pitch in
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 2.7
"Tar Heel," evidence indicates, was a derogatory nickname applied to North Carolina soldiers by others in the Army of Northern Virginia. It was a natural, given that the boys from the piney woods oftentimes were harvesters of tar, pitch, and turpentine. It...
Format: article
Republican rule
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 10.1
Newspaper editorial praising the accomplishments of the Republican Party in North Carolina during Reconstruction. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Civil War journals
This lesson integrates creative writing with Social Studies and enhances knowledge of the effects of the Civil War on people.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Gwen A. Jones.
Timeline of Reconstruction in North Carolina
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.2
Timeline of major events in North Carolina during Union occupation and after the Civil War, 1862–1877.
Format: timeline
The election process
In Election 2008, page 3.3
Resources that examine the various aspects of the American election process from contemporary and historical perspectives.
Format: bibliography
Advertisements from the Boston News-Letter, 1713
Advertisements from the Boston News-Letter, 1713
Advertisements: Ran-away last week from his Master Capt. John Corney of Boston, A Servant man Named Benjamin Wallis, aged about twenty years, well fed, full fac'd, beetle brow'd, pock freetn, brown hair curles at the end; had on a gray cloth Suite...
Format: image/newspaper
Freed people at New Bern
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.5
Excerpt from the report of Vincent Colyer, Superintendent of the Poor for Union-occupied North Carolina during the Civil War, about his work with freedmen and escaped slaves. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood and David Walbert.
Elizabeth, A Colored Minister of the Gospel, Born in Slavery
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 3.9
In this excerpt from her 1863 memoir, Elizabeth (her last name, if she had one, is unknown), a former slave, tells of her conversion to Christianity and her work as a minister. She faced opposition to her ministry both because she was African American and because she was a woman. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 3.10
Excerpt from the book by Harriet Jacobs, describing her master's attempts to exploit her sexually and her mistress' response to the situation. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
North Carolinians debate secession
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 1.4
Quotations from North Carolinians supporting and opposing secession in 1860–61. Includes historical commentary.
Format: document/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.