K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Suffrage: The changing role of women
In this lesson, students use oral history excerpts and photographs to learn about the women's suffrage movement in the United States from a variety of perspectives.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Why We Oppose Votes for Men
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.6
Satirical column by Alice Duer Miller, challenging people opposed to women's suffrage. Includes historical commentary.
Format: poster/primary source
Our Idea of Nothing at All
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.7
Poem by by Alice Duer Miller attacking a U.S. Senator from North Carolina who opposed women's suffrage. Includes historical commentary.
Format: poetry/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Elizabeth Freeman in suffrage demonstration
Elizabeth Freeman in suffrage demonstration
Elizabeth Freeman, a women's suffrage activist, participates in a demonstration for women's voting rights.
Format: image/photograph
Gertrude Weil urges suffragists to action
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.9
Letter from Gertrude Weil, president of the North Carolina Equal Suffrage League, to supporters on the eve of the North Carolina General Assembly's vote on the Nineteenth Amendment. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Gertrude Weil congratulates — and consoles — suffragists
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.11
Letter from Gertrude Weil, president of North Carolina's Equal Suffrage Association, to supporters after the Nineteenth Amendment was ratified by enough states to become part of the Constitution -- but failed to pass in North Carolina.
Format: letter/primary source
Lucy Burns
Lucy Burns
Women's suffrage movement leader Lucy Burns addresses a crowd.
Format: image/photograph
Frances Willard
Frances Willard
Portrait of Frances Willard, who was active in the movements for temperance and women's suffrage.
Format: image/photograph
Alice Paul
Alice Paul
Women's suffrage leader Alice Paul raises a glass in front of a banner.
Format: image/photograph
Gertrude Weil
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.4
Biography of Gertrude Weil (1879–1971) of Goldsboro, who led the fight for women's suffrage in North Carolina.
Format: biography
By Jill Molloy and L. Maren Wood.
Official program, Woman suffrage procession, 1913
Official program, Woman suffrage procession, 1913
Cover of program for women's suffrage procession, Washington, D.C., March 3, 1913, showing woman, in elaborate attire, with cape, blowing long horn, from which is draped a "votes for women" banner, on decorated horse, with U.S. Capitol in background.
Format: image/illustration
Carrie Chapman Catt
Carrie Chapman Catt
Portrait of Carrie Chapman Catt, two-time president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association.
Format: image/photograph
The North Carolina Equal Suffrage League
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.5
Report of the statewide organization working to obtain voting rights for women, 1917. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Women's suffrage movement leader Elizabeth Cady Stanton holds her daughter Harriot in this 1856 image.
Format: image/photograph
Susan B. Anthony
Susan B. Anthony
Women's suffrage movement leader Susan B. Anthony.
Format: image/photograph
Votes for Women
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.8
This poster, published by the North American Woman Suffrage Association, counters opponents arguments about why women shouldn’t be given the right to vote.
Format: poster/primary source
Florence F. Noyes in suffrage pageant
Florence F. Noyes in suffrage pageant
Classical dancer Florence Fleming Noyes, wears the costume of "Liberty" during a 1913 suffrage pageant in front of the Treasury Building in Washington, D.C. German actress Hedwig Reicher is wearing the costume of "Columbia."
Format: image/photograph
Timeline of Women's Suffrage
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.1
A timeline of the major events in the long campaign for women's voting rights, from the nation's independence in 1776 to North Carolina's ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1971.
Format: timeline
By Jill Molloy.
North Carolina and the women's suffrage amendment
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.10
Article tells the story of the political battle in North Carolina over ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment.
Format: article
Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Elizabeth Cady Stanton
“Elizabeth Cady Stanton and her daughter, Harriot—from a daguerreotype 1856.” Handwritten across the bottom of the image.
Format: image/photograph