K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Vietnam Veterans Memorial Park
A memorial honoring North Carolinians who were killed in the Vietnam War. Each name is engraved in a free-standing monolith in a 230-foot wide basin scooped out of the earth.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Duplin County Veterans Memorial Museum
See military artifacts and memorabilia at this museum which honors the servicemen and women of Dulpin County.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
The GI Bill
In Postwar North Carolina, page 2.1
The GI Bill, which helped veterans of World War II attend college, vastly expanded the nation's educated workforce and democratized universities.
Format: article
North Carolina Vietnam Veterans Memorial
North Carolina Vietnam Veterans Memorial
This is the North Carolina Vietnam Veterans Memorial. It is located between Lexington and Thomasville, North Carolina. It honors the North Carolinians who served and gave their lives in the Vietnam War.
Format: image/photograph
The Bonus Army
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 1.5
In 1932, in the depths of the Great Depression, thousands of World War I veterans set up camp in Washington, D.C., to lobby Congress to pay them their army bonus early. The Army dispersed them violently, and the public outcry contributed to President Hoover's failure to win reelection that year.
Format: article
A soldier's experience in Vietnam: Johnas Freeman
In Postwar North Carolina, page 7.8
Oral history interview with a North Carolina veteran of the Vietnam War. Freeman explains that, despite the difficulties he faced readjusting to everyday life after Vietnam, he did not have any regrets about his decision to serve in the military.
Format: interview/primary source
Confederate veterans memorial in Lenoir, NC
Confederate veterans memorial in Lenoir, NC
This is a memorial dedicated to the veterans of the Confederate Army in Lenoir, North Carolina. It is located downtown in the town square.
Format: image/photograph
Finding an emotional outlet you can get into
In The First Year, page 3.8
If you don't take care of yourself and respect your own needs, you can't meet your students' needs, either.
Format: article
By Kristi Johnson Smith.Commentary and sidebar notes by Lindy Norman.
The signing of the U.N. Charter
The signing of the U.N. Charter
Joaquin Fernandez Y Fernandez, Minister for Foreign Affairs from Chile is seated at a large round table and signs the United Nations Charter on June 26, 1945. A delegation of dignitaries stands behind him. Flags of the U.N. nations line the back wall of the...
Format: image/photograph
Snow days
In The First Year, page 3.2
Don't make assumptions about school policies, and remember that not all “rules” are written down.
By Kristi Johnson Smith.Commentary and sidebar notes by Lindy Norman.
Bonus marchers and police battle in Washington, DC
Bonus marchers and police battle in Washington, DC
Original caption read, "'Bonus Marchers' and police battle in Washington, DC. The marchers came to Washington, DC, to demand their veterans 'bonus' payment early from Congress. After several months of camping near the Anacostia River and after several confrontations...
Format: image/photograph
Memorial Day
Memorial Day was established after the Civil War as "Decoration Day," so called because of the custom of decorating soldiers' graves with flowers.
Format: article
A soldier's experience in Vietnam: Robert L. Jones
In Postwar North Carolina, page 7.7
Oral history interview with a North Carolina veteran of the Vietnam War. Jones discusses how his time in Vietnam left him with self-doubt and confusion about who he was as a person.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
A soldier's experience in Vietnam: Herbert Rhodes
In Postwar North Carolina, page 7.4
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 5.7
Oral history interview with a North Carolina veteran of the Vietnam War. Rhodes describes his interactions with South Vietnamese civilians, and what he believes was the purpose behind the war.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Anti-war demonstrations
In Postwar North Carolina, page 7.9
Although the anti-war protests of the 1960s and 1970s are remembered today mainly as something young people participated in, people aged 18 to 29 actually were more likely to support the war than their elders, and college campuses were deeply divided on the issue. Protests in cities drew people of all ages and backgrounds. This page includes video of a 1967 march on the Pentagon.
Monuments and memorials
In Alternative discussion formats, page 5
In Educator's Guides: North Carolina Digital History, page 4.5
Creating monuments or memorials for historical and literary figures encourages students to think creatively and provides a lively structure for an in-class discussion.
Format: activity
By Kathryn Walbert.
More than tourism: Cherokee, North Carolina, in the post-war years
In Postwar North Carolina, page 2.10
In the 1950s, photographer Hugh Morton trained his camera on Cherokee, North Carolina, documenting the substantial tourism boom that had developed on the Eastern Band of Cherokees’ Qualla Boundary reservation. These photos provide a vivid record of an important moment in the history of both the Eastern Band and the mountain region as a whole.
Format: essay
By Andrew Denson.
Tar Heels pitch in
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 2.7
"Tar Heel," evidence indicates, was a derogatory nickname applied to North Carolina soldiers by others in the Army of Northern Virginia. It was a natural, given that the boys from the piney woods oftentimes were harvesters of tar, pitch, and turpentine. It...
Format: article
Basic training
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 6.2
Oral history interview with a North Carolina man about his experiences after being drafted into the U.S. Army in 1942. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
World War I Memorials
In this online course we study America's efforts to memorialize and mourn over 116,000 men and women who lost their lives while serving their country during World War I. We analyze local war memorials in cities and counties throughout America; then we turn to the design and function of military memorials that were erected on-site, at battlefields and cemeteries, in France and Belgium along the western front. By the end of the course you will understand the social and political context of commemoration and the role that physical memorials play in America's efforts to remember World War 1.
Format: article/online course