K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Small and large sand volume barrier islands
In Small sand volume barrier islands: Environmental processes and development risks, page 1
Barrier islands are the dominant geographic feature of sandy coastlines, but recurring storm damage on some demonstrates that different barrier islands present very different levels of risk to residential development. One of the best indicators of development...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Small sand volume barrier islands: Environmental processes and development risks
This Carolina Environmental Diversity Explorations “virtual field trip” explores the nature and structure of barrier islands with small sand volume, on which built structures are highly susceptible to damage from hurricanes.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)
Bear Island dunes (1)
In Large sand volume barrier islands: Environmental processes and development risks, page 4
We will begin our trip by visiting Bear Island, the undeveloped island of the pair of large sand volume barrier islands. Figure 3 shows the high volume sand dunes on Bear Island. These dunes are about 50 feet high and cover an area about 5 miles long and one-half...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Large sand volume barrier islands: Environmental processes and development risks
This Carolina Environmental Diversity Explorations “virtual field trip” explores the nature and structure of barrier islands with large sand volume, on which built structures are relatively well insulated from hurricane damage.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)
Modeling volume
This activity helps the students see how the volume of something includes the third dimension (width or depth) which is different from area. This activity also helps the students "prove" that the volume formula actually works. Students will already know that the volume of a rectangular prism is found by multiplying the object's length, width, and height. By using the blocks as models of volume, the students should come to realize that volume can be calculated simply by multiplying the area of the base by the height of the rectangular prism. Thus, they will come to realize that there is no need to try and fill the entire box with the tiny 1cm cubes, they can simply fill the bottom (to see how many cubes are there) and figure out how many rows there will be and multiply.
Format: lesson plan (grade 6–8 Mathematics)
By Erin Foerster.
Small and large sand volume islands
In Large sand volume barrier islands: Environmental processes and development risks, page 1
This field trip follows another in this series, Small Sand Volume Islands. Readers should plan to take these trips sequentially, to compare the two types of islands. The thesis of both trips is that the volume of sand that comprises...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Juicy Juice Box
Students will be able to use their knowledge of volume and surface area through this fun, hands-on activity.
Format: lesson plan (grade 7 Mathematics)
By Sheila Martin.
Commercial and industrial designers: Working with volume
In CareerStart lessons: Grade eight, page 3.7
In this lesson, students calculate the volume of a variety of boxes, and calculate the change in volume that would result from a change in the boxes' dimensions.
Format: lesson plan (grade 7–8 Mathematics)
By Valerie Davis, Sonya Rexrode, and Monika Vasili.
Bogue Inlet
In Large sand volume barrier islands: Environmental processes and development risks, page 10
Figure 9 shows the Bear Island beach near Bogue Inlet. This area appears as a white band in the right middle distance in Figure 8. Note the almost continuous maritime grassland in the foreground and bare sand stretching back into the salt marsh on the shore...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Giving meaning to volume and surface area
This lesson is designed to help students give meaning to volume and surface area by solving problems using a meaningful situation rather than formulas.
Format: lesson plan (grade 7–8 Mathematics)
By Grayson Wheatley.
Dune erosion on Bear Island
In Hurricanes on sandy shorelines: Lessons for development, page 10
Figure 7 shows that not all of the barrier islands are flattened when hurricanes make landfall over them. This photograph shows the beach and seawardmost dunes of Bear Island after five hurricanes battered them in two years. The remnants of dead maritime thicket...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Newspaper basket
Students use measurement skills to create a basket and respond to questions involving fractions, decimals, and geometric measurements.
Format: lesson plan (grade 6 Mathematics)
By Susan Jennings.
Submarines: Using mass, volume and density to create a working submarine
The students will design a submarine that will float, subsurface, sink, and return once again to the water's surface by external manipulation of the submarine outside of an aquarium. In order to accomplish this, the students will use not only the concepts of mass, volume, and density but will also integrate buoyancy and ballast in their submarine design.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Mathematics and Science)
By Amy Koonce.
Slice it! Rotate it!: Volumes of revolution
The students will first view the animated slicing and rotating of various area about the x-axis or about different lines at internet sites. Then the student will complete a lab experience in which various food items will be examined as to what planar region created them.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Mathematics)
By Sharon Whitted.
Decomposition
Students will observe decomposition in a pile of grass clippings and in a compost heap over time.
Format: lesson plan (grade 5 Science)
By Monica Dubbs.
Density
In Integrating Chemistry and Algebra II, page 3
Students will determine the density of two unknown liquids by collecting mass and volume data. Each group of students will be given a different volume of the liquids to measure, they will combine their data to create a graph. Using the graph students will determine the density of the two liquids by calculating the slope of the two lines. Students will also use a graphing calculator to determine the slope of the two lines.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 English Language Arts, Mathematics, and Science)
By Jennifer Elmo.
How is coastal sand formed into barrier islands?
In Small sand volume barrier islands: Environmental processes and development risks, page 2
Coastal sand is organized into barrier islands when three conditions are met: There is a supply of sand sufficient to form islands; sea level is rising; and there are winds and waves with sufficient energy to move the sand around....
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Does it float? Exploring density
Density is a property of matter that requires abstract understanding from your students. This lesson plan is a hands-on lab for exploring the concepts of mass, volume, density, and their relationship. This lab achieves several 8th grade science objectives and incorporates mathematical objectives as well. The lab can easily be used as an introductory lab for the year, thus covering not only the content objectives, but also procedures for completing labs throughout the course of the year.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 English Language Arts and Science)
By Trish Loudermilt.
Density of common liquids
Each lab team will determine the density of water and one of the sample liquids. The class will then compile their information.
Format: lesson plan (grade 6 and 8 English Language Arts, Mathematics, and Science)
By Sansia Coble.
A high-elevation creek
In Roan Mountain Highlands, page 17
Figure 15 shows another view of the high-elevation northern hardwoods community with the headwaters of a typical mountain drainage creek. Note the relatively large size and square shape of the stones in the creek. This is what we would expect in small headwater...
By Jennifer Godwin-Wyer and Dirk Frankenberg.