K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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Resources tagged with African Americans are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

4-H club contributions to the war effort
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.7
This page includes three reports sent by county agents of the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service after the war ended. Each county agent outlined the contributions of 4-H club members in his or her county to the war effort. Includes historical commentary.
Format: report/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
An account of the slave trade on the coast of Africa
In Colonial North Carolina, page 4.6
Excerpt from a book by a former surgeon on a slave ship, describing the horrors of the Middle Passage from Africa to America. Historical commentary is included. Warning: This document may not be suitable for all ages. Please use discretion.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Shane Freeman.
Address to the Colored People of North Carolina
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 10.7
1870 broadside urging African Americans to support Governor William Woods Holden, then facing impeachment for his use of the militia to stop Ku Klux Klan violence. Includes historical commentary.
Format: poster/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
African American college students, 1906
In North Carolina in the New South, page 4.7
Records of pupils at the North Carolina Colored State Normal Schools (now Winston-Salem State University, Fayetteville State University, and Elizabeth City State University), 1906, with information about parents' occupations and how students paid their expenses. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
African American college students: Classroom activity
In this lesson plan, students will read a primary source document about African American college students in 1906 and answer a series of questions as they assume the role of a young African American woman in the early 20th century.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Social Studies)
By Jamie Lathan.
African American soldiers
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.9
After Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, some 180,000 African American soldiers fought for the Union cause in the Civil War.
Format: article
African American spirituals
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 6.2
Excerpt from Frederick Douglass' autobiography in which he describes the purpose and effect of spirituals for enslaved people. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
The African American State Fair
In North Carolina in the New South, page 1.10
For several years in the late nineteenth century, African American farmers held their own state fair in Raleigh to showcase improvements in agriculture.
Format: article
By Jim L. Sumner.
African Americans get the vote in eastern North Carolina
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.9
After the Civil War, African American communities in eastern North Carolina, having already tasted freedom during the war, were ready to fight for political rights.
Format: article
African and African American storytelling
In Colonial North Carolina, page 4.7
The advent of slavery led to changes in the tradition of African storytelling. Tales in Africa had once featured the lion, elephant, and hyena; African tales in America began to star the rabbit, fox, and bear. To the African in slavery, the Brer Rabbit tales became a source of identity.
Format: article
By Madafo Lloyd Wilson.
Africans before captivity
In Colonial North Carolina, page 4.1
Most Africans who came to North America were from West Africa and West Central Africa. This article describes some of the cultures and history of those regions prior to the beginning of the slave trade.
Format: article
Africans before captivity: Graphic organizer
This activity provides a way for students to further their comprehension as they read an article about the regions of Africa from which most American slaves originated. Students will complete a graphic organizer and answer a series of questions.
Format: worksheet/lesson plan (grade 9–12 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Bicycles: Scourge of the streets?
In North Carolina in the New South, page 5.4
Newspaper editorials about a collision between a bicylclist and a pedestrian in Wilmington, North Carolina, 1897. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
A Bill to Prevent All Persons from Teaching Slaves to Read or Write, the Use of Figures Excepted (1830)
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.9
Law enacted by the North Carolina General Assembly, 1830. Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Billy Graham and civil rights
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.3
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 3.9
An exchange of letters between the Reverend Billy Graham and President Dwight Eisenhower, March 1956, on the Church's role in civil rights. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The birth of "Jim Crow"
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.1
During the years that followed Reconstruction, and especially after 1890, state governments in the South adopted segregationist laws mandating separation of the races in nearly every aspect of everyday life. This system was known informally as "Jim Crow."
Format: book
Black businesses in Durham
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.7
Excerpt from a 1912 article by W. E. B. Du Bois praising Durham's black business community and the tolerance of their white counterparts. Includes historical and biographical background.
Format: article/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Black codes, 1866
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.6
Excerpts of legislation passed by the North Carolina General Assembly after the Civil War to limit the freedoms of former slaves. Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood and David Walbert.
A black officer in an integrated Army
In Postwar North Carolina, page 3.5
Interview with the black commander of white troops in an American battalion in occupied Germany after the U.S. military was desegregated. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source