K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Establishing the site grid
Establishing the site grid
Photograph of students using a transit to establish a grid line at Occaneechi Town.
Format: image/photograph
Ethnographic map of North America
Ethnographic map of North America
Henry Lange's 1854 map, Ethnographisches Karte von Nord Amerika. The map is shaded to show the locations of Indian groups in North America. A note in the upper right corner of the complete map explains: "This map shows the sites...
Format: image/map
Ethnographic map of North America - detail
Ethnographic map of North America - detail
Detail of Henry Lange's 1854 map, Ethnographisches Karte von Nord Amerika. The map is shaded to show the locations of Indian groups in North America. A note in the upper right corner of the complete map explains: "This map shows...
Format: image/map
Excavated features — after excavation
Excavated features — after excavation
A photograph and drawing of the feature after excavation has been completed.
Format: image/photograph
Excavated features — before excavation
Excavated features — before excavation
A photograph and map of an unexcavated archaeological feature at Occaneechi Town.
Format: image/photograph
Excavated features — during excavation
Excavated features — during excavation
A photograph and map of an unexcavated archaeological feature at Occaneechi Town.
Format: image/photograph
Excavated post hole structure
Excavated post hole structure
A circular ring of excavated post holes at the Wall site, near Occaneechi Town, showing where a house once stood.
Format: image/photograph
Excavated wall-trench structure
Excavated wall-trench structure
The excavated remains of a wall-trench structure and associated pit at Occaneechi Town.
Format: image/photograph
Excavating an ancient pit
Excavating an ancient pit
Photograph of a student excavating the contents from an ancient pit.
Format: image/photograph
Excavating Occaneechi Town: An archaeology primer
Republished with permission from the Research Laboratories of Archaeology, the Archaeology Primer uses photographs of the excavations at Occaneechi Town to introduce fundamental concepts of archaeology. The primer provides an introduction to the methods of archaeology and to some common types of artifacts, and prepares students to participate in an electronic archaeological dig.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)
Excavation block
Excavation block
An exavation block at Occaneechi Town with plowed soil removed. The dark stains are archaeological features.
Format: image/photograph
The fate of North Carolina's native peoples
In Colonial North Carolina, page 3.8
After the Tuscarora War (1711–1713) and Yamasee War (1715–1716), only the Cherokee among North Carolina's native peoples remained intact. The Coastal Plain and Piedmont were effectively cleared for European settlement.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
First Human inhabitants
First Human inhabitants
Format: image/photograph
First peoples
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 2.1
Beringia was a wide land bridge between Alaska and Siberia that was periodically exposed during the last Great Ice Age. According to a widely-held theory, the first people to live in North America were Asians who followed animal herds across Beringia. The Paleoindians living in North Carolina by 9000 BCE were descendents of these first North Americans. Nobody knows how long it took before the first Paleoindians reached North Carolina, but the few artifacts they left create an image of their past.
Format: article
Fishing weir
Fishing weir
Fishing weir near Eastport, Maine. A weir is a traditional American Indian fishing device, consisting of a trap made of sticks or brush with a large basket in the middle. Weir designs vary according to the location and waters being fished. Typically, setting...
Format: image/photograph
Flowers in Glacier National Park, MT
Flowers in Glacier National Park, MT
Red and yellow flowers in Glacier National Park, Montana. The park protects over one million acres of land in the Northern Rocky Mountains, from lakes and valleys formed by glaciers to forests, alpine meadows, and rugged peaks. It is known to Native Americans...
Format: image/photograph
The forest people
In Intrigue of the Past, page 3.3
Paleoindian culture died out across North America by 8000 BC. Archaeologists say this was bound to happen. The Ice Age had ended, the megafauna were extinct, and the boreal forests faded as deciduous ones spread across the East in the warmer climate. Faced with significant environmental changes, the Native Americans adapted. Archaeologists call their way of life and the time in which they lived Archaic.
Forests and fires
In Forests and fires: The longleaf pine savanna, page 1
Americans of different eras have viewed forest fires very differently. Most modern Americans view them as natural disasters. They base this opinion on widely publicized devastating fires that have swept through the brushland areas near Los Angeles and Yellowstone...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Forests and fires: The longleaf pine savanna
This Carolina Environmental Diversity Explorations “virtual field trip” examines the role of fire in maintaining the longleaf pine savanna as well as other rare plant communities found in Camp Lejune, North Carolina.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)
Fort Dobbs and the French and Indian War in North Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 8.2
During the French and Indian War (1754–1763), North Carolina settlers fought the Cherokee, sent troops to fight in the North, and built Fort Dobbs in Rowan County to defend the frontier.
Format: article