K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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Resources tagged with American history are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

1869: A report on schools in North Carolina
In this lesson, students look at a report on the status of education in North Carolina in 1869 and discuss the reasons given then for why the Governor and Legislature should support educating North Carolina's children. They are provided an opportunity to compare and contrast the 1869 document against their own ideas about the civic duty to attend school through age sixteen and its relative value to the state and the country.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Victoria Schaefer.
20th-century warfare: Unique contributions of American Indians
In this lesson, high school students will assess the importance and contributions of the American Indian in the United States' twentieth century wars. They focus in particular on the Navajo Code Talkers.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 Social Studies)
By John B. Jones.
The African American experience in NC after Reconstruction
The documents included in this lesson come from The North Carolina Experience collection of Documenting the American South and specifically focus on African Americans and race relations in the early 20th century. The lesson juxtaposes accounts that relate to both the positive improvements of black society and arguments against advancement. Combined, these primary sources and the accompanying lesson plan could be used as a Document Based Question (DBQ) in an AP US history course.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Meghan Mcglinn.
Along the Trail of Tears
A part of history is often forgotten when teaching younger students. This is the relocation of the Cherokee Indians when the white settlers wanted their property. The US Government moved whole groups of Indians under harsh conditions. This trip became known as the Trail of Tears. Using this as a background students will explore and experiment with persuasive writing as they try to express the position of Cherokee leaders.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4–5 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Glenda Bullard.
Analyzing children's letters to Mrs. Roosevelt
Students will analyze letters that children wrote to Eleanor Roosevelt during the Great Depression.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 Social Studies)
By Angie Panel Holthausen.
The Bill of Rights and the U.S. Supreme Court
In this lesson, students work in groups and individually to understand how the Constitution/Bill of Rights is a living document and how Supreme Court decisions protect the rights of all Americans.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 Social Studies)
By Grace Wasserman.
Black cowboys
In this lesson, students will use the Blacks in the West Mini Page to learn about black cowboys, read an excerpt from Nat Love’s biography, and create a comic about a black cowboy. This lesson teaches students about figures rarely shown in social studies texts and allows them to demonstrate their knowledge in a variety of ways.
Format: lesson plan
By Summer Pennell.
Black cowboys during Reconstruction
In this lesson, students will learn about African-American cowboys in the American West during Reconstruction. Students will use the Blacks in the West Mini Page and other online sources to learn about the topic and then demonstrate their knowledge by writing their own fictional narrative. Social Studies and Language Arts teachers may wish to work together for this lesson. This can be used to introduce research skills, to round out lessons on the American West in both Social Studies and ELA and to reinforce short story writing skills.
Format: lesson plan
By Summer Pennell.
Canning for country and community
In this lesson plan, students will use primary source documents to evaluate the technological challenges of food preservation in the 30s and 40s, compare food preservation in the first half of the twentieth century with today, and consider the political role of food in the community.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Melissa Thibault.
Change in a democratic society (Lesson 1 of 3)
This lesson will demonstrate how art can imitate society. Students will learn about democracy in America through an examination of and a Paideia seminar on "The Sword of Damocles," an oil painting by British painter Richard Westall. This lesson should be used after a study of colonial times in America and through the American Revolution.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Social Studies)
By Sharyn West.
Changes in a democratic society (Lesson 2 of 3)
This lesson is the post-seminar activity to follow Changes in a Democratic Society, Lesson 1. Students will participate in tiered assignments reflecting on the Westall painting, "The Sword of Damocles," and the prior day's Paideia seminar on that painting.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Social Studies)
By Sharyn West.
Changes in a democratic society (Lesson 3 of 3)
This lesson is a follow-up to Changes in a Democratic Society, Lessons 1 and 2. Students will reflect upon and respond to a sculpture by Auguste Rodin, "Monument for the Defense of Paris." Permission has been granted by Ackland Art Museum to use the following sculptures: "Monument for the Defense of Paris" (Auguste Rodin) and "Wisdom Supporting Liberty" (Aime-Jules Dalou).
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Social Studies)
By Karen Wagoner.
Cherokee relocation
Students will use primary sources to investigate the boundaries of the Cherokee lands set for North Carolina after the Revolutionary War.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–10 Social Studies)
By Donna Hernandez.
"Civil Disobedience" excerpt seminar
This lesson plan is to be used for a seminar on an excerpt of Henry David Thoreau's work, "Civil Disobedience." The plan will follow the Paideia concept to discuss the great ideas of the text. The plan will provide a pre-guide activity, coaching activity, inner circle seminar questions, outer circle questions and a post writing assignment.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Francis Bryant.
Civil rights protests and dilemmas
In this lesson students explore well-known civil rights protests then listen to two oral histories of individuals who protested in their own way to promote equality for African Americans. Students specifically will consider personal risks involved in protest.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Civil rights wax museum project
In this lesson plan, students will choose African Americans prominent in the Civil Rights Movement and research aspects of their lives. They will create timelines of their subjects' lives and a speech about their subjects, emphasizing why they are remembered today.
Format: lesson plan (grade 5 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Sabrina Lewandowski.
Civil War journals
This lesson integrates creative writing with Social Studies and enhances knowledge of the effects of the Civil War on people.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Gwen A. Jones.
Civil War Tribune
This lesson focuses on student creativity along with the writing process. Art is also incorporated in a unique way. Students will use their research skills to complete a creative writing project on the Civil War.
Format: lesson plan (grade 5 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Aimee Adkins.
Commemorative landscapes
These lessons for elementary, middle, and high school were developed in collaboration with The University of North Carolina Library Commemorative Landscapes project to introduce and promote student understanding and writing of North Carolina’s history through commemorative sites, landscapes, and markers.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
A comprehensive study of North Carolina Indian tribes
Students will apply their research skills of gathering and validating information to study the eight state-recognized American Indian tribes of North Carolina in order to create an Honors U.S. History Project. Students then will create a comprehensive study of those tribes to be compiled into a notebook to be copied and shared with the eighth grade teachers of North Carolina History in our county.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 Social Studies)
By Wanda Taylor.