K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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Resources tagged with Civil War are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

African American soldiers
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.9
After Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, some 180,000 African American soldiers fought for the Union cause in the Civil War.
Format: article
African Americans get the vote in eastern North Carolina
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.9
After the Civil War, African American communities in eastern North Carolina, having already tasted freedom during the war, were ready to fight for political rights.
Format: article
Amending the U.S. Constitution
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.8
Text of the thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth amendments to the U.S. Constitution, passed after the Civil War to abolish slavery and to guarantee the civil rights of African Americans.
Format: constitution/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Amnesty letters
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.5
Letters from North Carolinians to President Andrew Johnson asking for amnesty after the Civil War. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The assassination of Abraham Lincoln
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 7.10
President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated April 14, 1865, five days after Lee's surrender at Appomattox and two weeks before Johnston's final surrender at Bennett Place.
Format: article
Assessing the North Carolina Civil War effort
In this lesson plan, students read about the Civil War effort in North Carolina and complete a graphic organizer detailing how various groups within the state influenced the war effort.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Jamie Lathan.
The Battle of Bentonville
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 7.9
Memoir of a Confederate soldier describing the march to Bentonville and the battle there on March 19, 1865. He describes the desperate state of the Confederate army by the end of the war. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The Battle of Gettysburg
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.8
The diary of Confederate soldier Louis Leon in the first days of July 1863, describing his experiences at the Battle of Gettysburg. Includes historical commentary.
Format: diary/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
The Battle of New Bern
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 3.5
The Battle of New Bern on March 14, 1862, won by Union General Burnside's forces, was the second of three major engagements on the North Carolina coast in the second year of the Civil War.
Format: article
The battle of Roanoke Island
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 3.3
Dispatch from Roanoke Island to northern newspapers after the Union victory in February 1862. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
The burning of Elizabeth City
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 3.4
Excerpt from Richard Creecy's memoir describing the fall of Elizabeth City to Union troops in February 1862 and its partial burning by residents. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
The Burnside Expedition
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 3.1
Union General Ambrose Burnside led an assault on Roanoke Island in February 1862. Burnside's forces would take and hold much of the coast of North Carolina for the remainder of the war.
Format: article
"Can the very spirit of freedom die out?"
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 7.15
Diary of Catherine Anne Devereux Edmondston, May 7, 1865, bemoaning the Confederate surrender. Includes historical commentary.
Format: diary/primary source
Cargo manifests of Confederate blockade runners
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.4
Cargo manifests of various ships that ran the Union blockade to bring goods from Nassau, in the Bahamas, to Wilmington, North Carolina, during the Civil War. Includes historical commentary.
Format: document/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Civil War army hospitals
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 5.9
A description of medicine, hospitals, and the work of army doctors and nurses in the U.S. Civil War.
Format: article
A civil war at home: Treatment of Unionists
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.11
Excerpt from the memoir of W. B. Younce, an Ashe County man who was drafted into the Confederate army and deserted. He describes the conditions on the home front, particularly the treatment of Unionists. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood and David Walbert.
Civil War casualties
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.12
Historians estimate that about 620,000 Americans died in the Civil War -- almost as many as have died in all other U.S. wars combined. This article explains why.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Civil War uniforms
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 5.3
Article describes the clothing and baggage of northern and southern soldiers during the U.S. Civil War. Includes video of a Civil War reenactment.
Format: article
The Civil War: From Bull Run to Appomattox
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 2.3
Summary of military and political action in the U.S. Civil War, 1861–1865.
Format: article