K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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Resources tagged with Constitution are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

1835 amendments to the North Carolina Constitution
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.3
Amendments to the North Carolina state constitution passed in 1835. Includes historical commentary.
Format: constitution/primary source
The 1868 constitution
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.11
In accordance with the Reconstruction Acts, North Carolina wrote a new constitution in 1868. In addition to abolishing slavery, the new constitution gave more power to the people and to the governor, and called for free public schools, state prisons, and charitable institutions.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
The 1971 constitution
In Postwar North Carolina, page 8.3
North Carolina's constitution was rewritten in 1971 to incorporate the many amendments made since Reconstruction.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Amending the U.S. Constitution
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.8
Text of the thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth amendments to the U.S. Constitution, passed after the Civil War to abolish slavery and to guarantee the civil rights of African Americans.
Format: constitution/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The Bill of Rights
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 6.7
The text of the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution, with historical commentary.
Format: constitution/primary source
The Constitution of the United States
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 6.4
An original print copy of the Constitution, 1787. Page 2 of 2 of the original printed Constitution. We...
Format: constitution/primary source
The Constitution of the United States: Amendments 11-27
Amendment XI Passed by Congress March 4, 1794. Ratified February 7, 1795. The Judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against...
Format: constitution
The Constitutional Convention
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 6.3
The Articles of Confederation proved too weak to govern the new United States effectively, and in 1787, Congress authorized a convention to revise the document. Instead, the convention wrote an entirely new constitution for the United States.
Format: article
Debating the Federal Constitution
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 6.5
Excerpt of a speech given by William Richardson Davie at the convention called in North Carolina, 1788, to consider ratification of the United States Constitution. Davie explains why the new Constitution is necessary and why it is not a threat to liberty and argues for ratification. Includes historical commentary.
Format: speech/primary source
The Equal Rights Amendment
In Postwar North Carolina, page 8.6
Oral history interview with activist Martha McKay about the ERA's defeat in North Carolina. Includes historical background.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The Federalist Papers: No. 68. The mode of electing the president
In Election 2008, page 4.5
In this essay, written as a letter to the New York Packet in 1788, Alexander Hamilton argues for the method of electing the President spelled out in the original United States Constitution.
Format: letter
The North Carolina Constitution and Declaration of Rights
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.14
Full text of the 1776 state constitution of North Carolina, with historical commentary.
Format: constitution/primary source
North Carolina demands a declaration of rights
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 6.6
North Carolina initially rejected the United States Constitution, insisting that it be amended and that a Declaration of Rights be added. The text of the proposed declaration and amendments is provided here with historical commentary noting which provisions found their way into the Bill of Rights.
Format: document/primary source
North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina during the Civil War and Reconstruction (1860–1876). Topics include debates over secession, battles and strategies, the war in North Carolina, the soldier's experience, the home front, freedom and civil rights for former slaves, Reconstruction, and the "redemption" of the state by conservatives.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New Nation
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the early national period (1790–1836). Topics include the development of state government and political parties, agriculture, the Great Revival, education, the gold rush, the growth of slavery, Cherokee Removal, and battles over internal improvements and reform.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New South
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the decades after the Civil War (1870–1900). Topics include changes in agriculture, the growth of cities and industry, the experiences of farmers and mill workers, education, cultural changes, politics and political activism, and the Wilmington Race Riot.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Postwar North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the postwar era (1945–1975).
Format: book (multiple pages)
Ratifying the amendments
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.4
In 1835, a convention passed amendments to the North Carolina state constitution. In this activity, students map votes for ratification by county and explain the patterns they see.
Format: activity
By David Walbert.
Reconstruction
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.1
Brief history of Reconstruction, including Lincoln's plans, Johnson's presidency, radical reconstruction, military reconstruction, and the end of Reconstruction with the election of 1876.
Format: article
Revolutionary North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the era of the American Revolution. Topics include the Regulators, the resistance to Great Britain, the War for Indpendence, and the creation of new governments.
Format: book (multiple pages)