K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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Resources tagged with Durham County are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

4-H club contributions to the war effort
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.7
This page includes three reports sent by county agents of the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service after the war ended. Each county agent outlined the contributions of 4-H club members in his or her county to the war effort. Includes historical commentary.
Format: report/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
The aftermath of Martin Luther King's assassination
In Postwar North Carolina, page 6.9
Reactions in Durham ranged from violent to peaceful after civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr., was murdered in Memphis on April 4, 1968.
Format: article
Black businesses in Durham
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.7
Excerpt from a 1912 article by W. E. B. Du Bois praising Durham's black business community and the tolerance of their white counterparts. Includes historical and biographical background.
Format: article/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The Bonsack machine and labor unrest
In North Carolina in the New South, page 3.7
When the Duke tobacco company adopted the Bonsack machine for rolling cigarettes, workers who had rolled cigarettes by hand were thrown out of work, and their replacements made less money.
Format: article
Desegregating public accommodations in Durham
In Postwar North Carolina, page 5.6
After the Freedom Rides of 1961 led to integration of interstate buses and terminals, the Civil Rights Movement moved on to "Freedom Highways" in 1962 -- campaigning to end segregation at establishments that served the traveling public. The Howard Johnson's restaurant on Chapel Hill Boulevard became a focal point in Durham.
Format: article
The Dukes of Durham
In North Carolina in the New South, page 2.7
After the Civil War, Orange County farmer Washington Duke put everything he had into growing tobacco. From farming he quickly expanded into manufacturing, and by the end of the nineteenth century, his son controlled the largest tobacco industry in the world.
Format: article
Durham's "Black Wall Street"
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.6
In the early twentieth century, Parrish Street in Durham, North Carolina, known as "Black Walll Street," was the hub of African American business activity.
Format: article
The Great Depression and World War II
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the Great Depression and World War II (1929–1945).
Format: book (multiple pages)
Johnston surrenders
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 7.11
Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston surrendered his army to Union General William T. Sherman at Bennett Place in present-day Durham, North Carolina on April 26, 1865, effectively ending the Civil War.
Format: article
"The mill don't need him tonight"
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 3.3
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 5.4
WPA interview with a Durham, North Carolina, girl about her family's experiences during the Great Depression. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Mustering out of the Confederate army
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 7.12
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 8.2
Confederate General Joseph Johnston surrendered his army to William T. Sherman on April 26, 1865, at Bennett Place in present-day Durham, North Carolina. Soldiers under Johnston's command received paroles from Union authorities and were sent home. Includes video of a Civil War reenactment.
Format: article
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina during the Civil War and Reconstruction (1860–1876). Topics include debates over secession, battles and strategies, the war in North Carolina, the soldier's experience, the home front, freedom and civil rights for former slaves, Reconstruction, and the "redemption" of the state by conservatives.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the early 20th century
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the first decades of the twentieth century (1900–1929). Topics include changes in technology and transportation, Progressive Era reforms, World War I, women's suffrage, Jim Crow and African American life, the cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and labor unrest, and the Gastonia stirke of 1929.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New South
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the decades after the Civil War (1870–1900). Topics include changes in agriculture, the growth of cities and industry, the experiences of farmers and mill workers, education, cultural changes, politics and political activism, and the Wilmington Race Riot.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.8
On the first of April 1899, the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company opened for business in Durham, North Carolina. The first month’s collections, after the payment of commissions, amounted only to $1.12, but from such beginnings North Carolina Mutual grew to be the largest African American managed financial institution in the United States.
Format: article
Opposition to the Knights of Labor
In North Carolina in the New South, page 3.11
Editorial in a Durham newspaper, 1887, expressing concern about the Knights of Labor. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Postwar North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the postwar era (1945–1975).
Format: book (multiple pages)
Recent North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore recent North Carolina (1975–present). Topics include politics, the economy, the environment, natural disasters, and increasing diversity.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Urban renewal and Durham's Hayti community
In Recent North Carolina, page 2.7
Oral history interview about the impact of the construction of NC 147 through Durham, North Carolina, which destroyed much of the city's historically African American Hayti community. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.