K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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Resources tagged with English language learners are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

A “defining moment” in editorial writing
Students will be introduced to the definition mode of writing. Students will learn to define a particular subject by responding in an editorial format. Students will first compose an editorial graphic organizer, which will aid in composing a completed editorial using the writing process. This lesson includes modifications for a Novice Low Limited English student.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts and English Language Development)
By Susan Brooks and Carrie Mabry.
The Three Little Wolves and the Big Bad Pig
This lesson plan focuses on a English Language Arts objectives: similarity and difference. Students compare the story The Three Little Pigs and The Three Little Wolves and the Big Bad Pig by Eugene Trivizas. Students will work collaboratively in small heterogeneous groups to apply strategies for comprehension and vocabulary.
Format: lesson plan (grade 1 English Language Arts and English Language Development)
By Betty Coleman-Canty and Michelle Swain.
Who Moved My Cheese? for Teens
Students read, discuss, and write about Who Moved My Cheese? for Teens by Spencer Johnson, M.D., a parable about life's changes, and how best to benefit from them. By reading the parable, students will learn ways to react positively to inevitable change, and gain insight into their personal decision-making processes regarding changes in their lives, now and in the future. This lesson plan is modified for Advanced English Language Learners in the 9th and 10th grades. It is written for 45 minute class periods, but can be modified for 90 minute block classes.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts and English Language Development)
By Ann Gerber.
A'planting we will go
This lesson is based on the book, The Tiny Seed, by Eric Carle. This story will be used to introduce the students to the concept that seeds change and grow into plants when conditions in the environment including temperature, light, water and soil are appropriate. Students will learn that plants produce seeds that can become new plants. Through extended activities, the students will experience first-hand the germination of seeds. They will become familiar with the parts of a plant and learn how each part works to produce a healthy plant.
Format: lesson plan (grade 1 English Language Arts, English Language Development, and Science)
By Karol Schriber.
The American Dream
In conjunction with a unit on Puritanism, students will define and illustrate their personal definition of the American Dream or their concept of the dream in general.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts and English Language Development)
By Becky Ackert and Deborah Belknap.
Anatomy of the heart
Students develop their knowledge of the circulatory system by studying the structure and function of the heart and its vessels.
Format: lesson plan (grade 7 English Language Development and Science)
By Daniel Isenberg and Sharon Mcdonald.
And justice for all: The Trail of Tears, Mexican deportation, and Japanese internment
Many textbooks mention the Trail of Tears, but fail to mention that this early displacement of an ethnic minority is only the one of many legally-sanctioned forced relocations. This lesson will address the displacement of American Indians through the Trail of Tears, the forced deportation of Mexican Americans during the Great Depression, and the internment of Japanese American citizens during WWII.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Patricia Camp.
Animal adaptation
This lesson focuses on the adaptations, body structures, and behavior of animals. The students will explore animal growth and adaptations of animals. This lesson is designed to be taught during the reading of Stone Fox.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 English Language Development and Science)
By Jennifer Fessler and Karen Wright.
Animal adjectives
Students will describe animals as they review nouns and verbs associated with these animals. They will learn to use adjectives as they describe the animals. They will use this knowledge to write their stories about animals.
Format: lesson plan (grade 1–2 English Language Arts and English Language Development)
By Anita Baldwin, Ann Loftis, and Genevieve Kiser.
Awesome action words
Good writers use precise verbs to make stories interesting and vivid. In this lesson, students will learn to replace boring, redundant, generic verbs with more precise “Awesome Action Words.”
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–4 English Language Arts and English Language Development)
By DPI Writing Strategies.
Birds of a feather, an interdisciplinary unit: Language Arts wing
This lesson, which features Mark Twain's “Jim Baker's Blue-jay Yarn,” is part of an interdisciplinary unit on birds that contains math/science and language arts components. In the language arts wing, students will explore dialects and personification through this very entertaining tall tale full of the antics of talking blue-jays.
Format: lesson plan (grade 7 English Language Arts and English Language Development)
By Janet Fore.
Bubba: A Cinderella story
This lesson focuses on the whimsical interpretation of the Cinderella story. Students explore the story Bubba, the Cowboy Prince, through rich text and interpretations of the story.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 English Language Arts and English Language Development)
By Jennifer Fessler and Karen Wright.
"The Cask of Amontillado"
The short story "The Cask of Amontillado," by Edgar Allan Poe is an effective venue for teaching English I literary terms. The following lesson plan is designed to engage the reader in a deeper than superficial reading of the text. It is also designed to elicit discussion and written critical-thinking responses. This lesson assumes that the literary terms have already been introduced. However, if they have not, the teacher may use this lesson to introduce these terms in the context of the literature.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts and English Language Development)
By Guy Hill and Crystal Brown.
Civil rights wax museum project
In this lesson plan, students will choose African Americans prominent in the Civil Rights Movement and research aspects of their lives. They will create timelines of their subjects' lives and a speech about their subjects, emphasizing why they are remembered today.
Format: lesson plan (grade 5 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Sabrina Lewandowski.
Classification of matter
Students are introduced to the concept of different kinds of matter. Students create models of different substances to learn to identify the differences between elements, compounds, and mixtures. This lesson is developed so that teachers can use it with English as a Second Language students.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Development and Science)
By Anya Childs and Rhonda Garrett.
Colors and symbols of stigmatization
This lesson is an introduction to the reading of Night by Elie Wiesel, which students will read independently. The students will do research to discover the different colors and symbols used to symbolize the Nazi party's list of undesirable people. The students will gain an understanding of how other people can arbitrarily judge other people as inferior.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts, English Language Development, and Social Studies)
By Sandra Hurd and Wilma Gale.
Comparative anatomy: A continuum
In groups, students will design a presentation that will trace the development of an organ system through the major phyla of the animal kingdom looking for the relationships between structure and function by documenting adaptations.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Development, Information Skills, and Science)
By Joan Warner and Melissa Thibault.
Comparing governments: International
This lesson focuses on comparing and contrasting national governments in North America and/or Central America. It is the second of two lessons about government. The other is Comparing Governments: Local, State, and National. This plan could be easily adapted for eighth-grade or high-school ESL students.
Format: lesson plan (grade 5 and 7 English Language Development and Social Studies)
By Tami Weaver and Wendy Pineda.
Comparing governments: Local, state, and national
This lesson on comparing governments will focus on looking at the similarities and differences between local, state, and federal governments in North Carolina and the United States. It is suggested that this lesson be followed by Comparing governments: International. This plan could be easily adapted for eighth-grade or high-school ESL students.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4–5 English Language Development and Social Studies)
By Tami Weaver and Wendy Pineda.
Creature creation: An elaboration writing activity
This lesson will focus on the writing element of elaboration. It will also tap into higher order thinking skills with the creation of a Coastal Plain imaginary animal and a creative story about the creature. This lesson could be linked to 4th grade Science and Social Studies objectives. For more in-depth knowledge in those other subjects, go to the lesson entitled Researching the Coastal Plain
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–4 English Language Arts and English Language Development)
By Ana Sanders and Heather Ennis.