K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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An Act to Encourage the Settlement of this Country (1707)
In Colonial North Carolina, page 2.2
Passed by the provincial Assembly of Carolina in 1707, this legislation provides incentives for settlers and explains the justification for doing so. Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Anticipation guide: "A Little Kingdom in Carolina"
A learner's guide to the article "A Little Kingdom in Carolina," this activity will support student comprehension.
Format: worksheet/learner's guide
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Anticipation guide: A royal colony
This activity presents students with a series of true/false statements about the early Carolina colony. Students respond to the statements before and after reading an article about the changes in the Carolina colony in its first fifty years, as it was divided into North and South Carolina and changed from a proprietary colony to a royal colony.
Format: /lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
The Charter of Carolina (1663)
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.4
In the Charter of Carolina, King Charles II of England granted the eight men known as the Lords Proprietors rights to the land that became North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: charter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Culpeper's Rebellion
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.11
In the 1670s, the British government insisted that exports from Carolina be taxed, but a group of settlers in the Albemarle region rebelled against what they saw as an unreasonable burden. The Lords Proprietors eventually regained control of the colony, but in the meantime, colonists set a precedent for governing themselves.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
A Declaration and Proposals of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina (1663)
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.6
Initial plans by the Lords Proprietors for settling and governing the province of Carolina. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: declaration/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
The Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina (1669)
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.9
The lengthy and complicated plan devised by the Lords Proprietors for the government of Carolina would have established a feudal system of elaborate courts, manors, and serfs. Includes historical commentary.
Format: constitution/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Land and work in Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.10
This article explains the key elements of feudalism, including its hierarchy of personal relationships and system of landholding, and how those elements evolved into the systems of labor and land ownership seen in colonial North Carolina.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
"Land and Work in Carolina" teaching strategies
A variety of suggested activities for use with an article that explains the key elements of feudalism, with a focus on how those elements evolved into the systems of labor and land ownership seen in colonial North Carolina.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
A little kingdom in Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.3
The original vision for Carolina was a feudal province in which eight "Lords Proprietors" would have nearly royal power, but with an elected assembly and guarantees of religious freedom.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
The Lords Proprietors
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.5
Brief biographies of the eight men named Lords Proprietors of the province of Carolina by Charles II in 1663.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Lords Proprietors graphic organizer
Completing this graphic organizer will aid students' understanding of the eight men who controlled the Carolina colony.
Format: chart/lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
North Carolina history: Grade 4 educator's guide
This educator's guide provides teaching suggestions designed to facilitate using the digital North Carolina history textbook with fourth-grade students.
Format: (multiple pages)
Reading guide: A Declaration and Proposals of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina (1663)
In this activity, students read the initial plans by the Lords Proprietors for settling and governing the province of Carolina. They respond to questions designed support their comprehension of this primary source document.
Format: /lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
A royal colony
In Colonial North Carolina, page 3.9
In 1729, the colony of North Carolina was taken over by the king, the turmoil of its early years quieted down, and for the next few decades, colonists enjoyed relative peace and stability. But one of the Lords Proprietors refused to sell back his share, and the administration of that "Granville District," encompassing the northern half of North Carolina, would cause problems for settlers later on.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Understanding Culpeper's Rebellion
In this lesson plan, students read an article about Culpeper's Rebellion and participate in a role-playing activity designed to help them understand the causes for and implications of this historical event.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.