K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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Resources tagged with Lumbee are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

A Dialect Dictionary of Lumbee English
In Teaching about North Carolina American Indians, page 2.2
Originally published as a booklet by the North Carolina Language and Life Project at NC State University, this page provides a brief explanation of Lumbee English as well as a dictionary of terms and definitions from the Lumbee English dialect.
Format: article
By Clare J. Dannenberg, Hayes A. Locklear, Natalie Schilling-Estes, and Dr. Walt Wolfram.
Federal recognition for Lumbee Indians
In Teaching about North Carolina American Indians, page 2.9
Introduction North Carolina recognizes the Lumbee Indian Tribe; however, Federal recognition has not been given. Why? What are the criteria for recognition? What are the reasons for and against Lumbee recognition? This lesson uses a teacher-made debate...
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Linda Tabor.
The Lowry War
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.12
Many Lumbee Indians in Robeson County resented the demands of the Confederate army. In 1864, members of the Lowry family raided the homes of wealthy slaveholders. The Home Guard executed Allen Lowry and his son William, but another son, Henry Berry Lowry, hid in the woods for years as outlaws, becoming folk heroes.
Format: article
Lumbee learning
In Teaching about North Carolina American Indians, page 2.4
Introduction Education for the Lumbee Tribe has always been important. After Reconstruction ended and the state of North Carolina began its journey to educate its people, no provisions were made for American Indians. Segregated schools provided education...
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 and 8 English Language Arts and Second Languages)
By Gazelia Carter.
The Lumbee: Who are they?
In Teaching about North Carolina American Indians, page 2.6
Introduction This activity for middle school grades allows students to survey the various theories concerning the ancestry of the Lumbee. Students will read and analyze four threads that seek to chronicle the ancestry of North Carolina’s largest...
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Gazelia Carter.
The Lumbees face the Klan
In Postwar North Carolina, page 3.8
In January 1958, the Ku Klux Klan burned crosses on the front lawns of two Indian families in Robeson County, North Carolina. In response, as many as a thousand Lumbees violently broke up a Klan meeting, and the Klan never again met publicly in Robeson County.
Format: article
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina history: Grade 4 educator's guide
This educator's guide provides teaching suggestions designed to facilitate using the digital North Carolina history textbook with fourth-grade students.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina during the Civil War and Reconstruction (1860–1876). Topics include debates over secession, battles and strategies, the war in North Carolina, the soldier's experience, the home front, freedom and civil rights for former slaves, Reconstruction, and the "redemption" of the state by conservatives.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the early 20th century
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the first decades of the twentieth century (1900–1929). Topics include changes in technology and transportation, Progressive Era reforms, World War I, women's suffrage, Jim Crow and African American life, the cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and labor unrest, and the Gastonia stirke of 1929.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Official Lumbee Vocabulary Test or How to Tell a Lum from a Foreigner
In Teaching about North Carolina American Indians, page 2.3
Try this Lumbee vocabulary quiz and see how well you know Lumbee English.
Format: article
By Clare J. Dannenberg, Hayes A. Locklear, Natalie Schilling-Estes, and Dr. Walt Wolfram.
Postwar North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the postwar era (1945–1975).
Format: book (multiple pages)
The search for the Lost Colony
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 4.4
No one knows what happened to the “Lost Colonists” of Roanoke Island -- but that has only made their story more interesting. Over the past 400 years, historians, archaeologists, storytellers, and outright liars have developed a number of theories about the vanished settlers.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Teaching about North Carolina American Indians
This web edition is drawn from a teachers institute curriculum enrichment project on North Carolina American Indian Studies conducted by the North Carolina Humanities Council. Resources include best practices for teaching about American Indians, suggestions for curriculum integration, webliographies, and lesson plans about North Carolina American Indians.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Triracial segregation in Robeson County
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.3
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 3.7
Letter from the mayor of Pembroke, North Carolina, explaining the town council's request that a railroad company provide separate waiting rooms for each of the county's three races (white, black, and Lumbee). Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
What does it mean?
In Teaching about North Carolina American Indians, page 2.7
Introduction Visual symbols can be important ways of communicating ideas. Individuals, corporations, communities, and organizations use logos, seals, flags, icons, and other visual symbols to represent their values, share their histories, and send...
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 and 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Gazelia Carter.
Where do the Lumbee live?
In Teaching about North Carolina American Indians, page 2.8
Introduction Knowing the location of a community, city, state or nation is important. More important, however, is understanding of the personality of the location. Robeson County, home of the Lumbee Tribe, is more than a North Carolina county that...
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–4 and 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Gazelia Carter.