K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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The Belk brothers' department stores
In North Carolina in the New South, page 2.12
When Henry and John Belk opened their first department store in Charlotte in 1895, the idea of buying everything under one roof -- and always for cash, not store credit -- was new to consumers. This excerpt from the history of Belk, Inc., tells the story of Henry Belk, his first store in Monroe, and the Belk Bros. stores in downtown Charlotte.
Format: book
Cities and public architecture
In North Carolina in the New South, page 5.7
In this activity, students compare photographs of public buildings in Charlotte before and after industrialization and the growth of the city in the late nineteenth century to learn about industrial wealth and the culture of the Gilded Age.
Format: article
Conditions at Camp Greene
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.8
This speech was given by Sherman E. Burroughs, a U.S. Representative from New Hampshire. In his speech, Burroughs protested the unsanitary conditions at Camp Greene, an army camp located outside of Charlotte, North Carolina. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: speech/primary source
Diary of a doughboy
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.9
Excerpts from a diary written by Willard Newton, who served in the U.S. Army in France during World War I. Describes trench warfare and conditions along the front. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: diary/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Electric streetcars
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 1.2
North Carolina's first electric streetcar systems were built between 1889 and 1902. The new form of transportation changed the layout of cities.
Format: article
The impact of busing in Charlotte
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.9
Interviews with former white and black students in Charlotte schools about their experiences before and after desegregation. Includes historical background.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Dayna Durbin Gleaves and David Walbert.
The Mecklenburg Resolves
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.3
On receiving news of Lexington and Concord in May 1775, the Mecklenburg County Committee of Safety adopted these "resolves," or resolutions, declaring all royal authority to be suspended. Includes historical commentary.
Format: document/primary source
North Carolina in the early 20th century
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the first decades of the twentieth century (1900–1929). Topics include changes in technology and transportation, Progressive Era reforms, World War I, women's suffrage, Jim Crow and African American life, the cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and labor unrest, and the Gastonia stirke of 1929.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New South
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the decades after the Civil War (1870–1900). Topics include changes in agriculture, the growth of cities and industry, the experiences of farmers and mill workers, education, cultural changes, politics and political activism, and the Wilmington Race Riot.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Opposition to busing
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.10
A 1974 interview with Jesse Helms in which Helms denounced his critics who believed that his opposition to forced busing was racist. Includes historical background.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Perspectives on school desegregation: Harriet Love
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.12
Interview with a woman who attended an all-black high school in Charlotte in the 1960s but whose children attended integrated schools, about the unintended effects of school desegregation. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kristin Post.
Postwar North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the postwar era (1945–1975).
Format: book (multiple pages)
Recent North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore recent North Carolina (1975–present). Topics include politics, the economy, the environment, natural disasters, and increasing diversity.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Revolutionary North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the era of the American Revolution. Topics include the Regulators, the resistance to Great Britain, the War for Indpendence, and the creation of new governments.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.8
The Supreme Court's ruling in Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education, April 20, 1971, which ordered the integration of Mecklenburg County's schools. Includes historical background.
Format: court decision/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
A teacher's protest: William Culp
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.7
Interview with a former teacher at an all-black high school in Charlotte, North Carolina. Includes historical background.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kristin Post.
Urban renewal and the displacement of communities
In Recent North Carolina, page 2.6
Oral history interview about the impact of urban renewal in Charlotte, North Carolina. Includes historical background and information about urban renewal.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.