K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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Resources tagged with Mexico are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

The Binational Migrant Education Program
In Bridging Spanish language barriers in Southern schools, page 3.1
The Binational Migrant Education Program helps students, teachers, school administration, and parents manage the education of students who move between the United States and Mexico.
By Jennifer Whytock.
Bridging language barriers
In Bridging Spanish language barriers in Southern schools, page 1.3
How schools can ease the transition for Latino immigrant students.
Format: article
By Regina Cortina.
Bridging Spanish language barriers in Southern schools
These articles provide background on Latino immigrants in North Carolina, administrative challenges in binational education, and strategies through which teachers can build on what Latino students bring to their classrooms to create a learning environment that meets the needs of all students.
Format: series (multiple pages)
Bridging the differences: Cultural background of Mexican students entering U.S. schools
In Bridging Spanish language barriers in Southern schools, page 1.4
Making the transition from life in Mexico to life in the United States can be difficult for students of Mexican origin. Schools and teachers can make that transition easier by understanding students' cultural backgrounds and by employing a few simple strategies.
Format: article
By Mary Faith Mount-Cors.
From rural Mexico to North Carolina
In Bridging Spanish language barriers in Southern schools, page 1.2
Most immigrants to North Carolina from Mexico come from rural areas, and it is valuable for teachers to understand these students' cultural backgrounds.
Format: article
By Regina Cortina.
The Mexican eagle
The Mexican eagle
A massive display of Mexico’s national emblem, the eagle, for Mexican Independence Day.
Format: image
The middle school challenge for English language learners of Mexican origin
In Bridging Spanish language barriers in Southern schools, page 3.2
English language learners of Mexican origin face numerous challenges in American middle schools, including cultural segregation and assumptions made by schools regarding the students' educational backgrounds. This article offers strategies for educators to help students overcome those challenges.
Format: article
By Mary Faith Mount-Cors.
The role of Mexican folklore in teaching and learning
In Bridging Spanish language barriers in Southern schools, page 2.4
One way teachers can connect with students of Mexican origin is by understanding the cultural knowledge they bring with them into the classroom, including the stories, proverbs, and legends they've learned. Learn more about Mexican folklore from this booklist and collection of online resources, and share this rich oral tradition with all your students.
Format: article
By Dayna Durbin Gleaves.
Special education in Mexico
In Bridging Spanish language barriers in Southern schools, page 3.3
In the 1990s, the inclusive education movement gained ground in Mexico, which resulted in the mainstreaming of special needs students into regular classrooms. The effects of this movement can be seen in the educational policies and services focusing on special needs students in Mexico.
Format: article
By Mary Faith Mount-Cors.
Two worlds: Educator's guide
Lesson plans and activities to be used with "Two Worlds: Prehistory, Contact, and the Lost Colony" -- the first part of a North Carolina history textbook for secondary students.
Format: book (multiple pages)