K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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Resources tagged with Moravian are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Chaos in Salem
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 5.6
Excerpt from diaries of the Moravian congregation at Salem, North Carolina, in 1781, describing the Moravians' treatment by Patriot militias. Includes historical commentary.
Format: diary/primary source
Cherokee mission schools
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.8
Description of Spring Place, a Moravian mission to the Cherokee that operated from 1801 to 1833. Describes the education received by Cherokee boys and girls for the purpose of "civilizing" them. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Diary of a journey of Moravians
In Colonial North Carolina, page 5.3
In 1733, a group of Moravians -- a Protestant Christian denomination originating in fourteenth-century Bohemia -- moved from Europe to North America seeking freedom from religious persecution. In 1753, a group of twelve single brothers left Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, for a new settlement in North Carolina. These excerpts from their diary show the difficulties they faced on their journey. Includes historical commentary.
Format: diary/primary source
Diary of a journey of Moravians
First-hand account of the journey of twelve Moravian brothers from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania to Bethabara, North Carolina in 1753.
Format: diary (multiple pages)
Discussion questions: Expanding to the west
This set of discussion questions was designed to help students understand an article about the settlement of the Piedmont region of North Carolina between 1730 and 1775.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Expanding to the west: Settlement of the Piedmont region, 1730 to 1775
In Colonial North Carolina, page 5.1
The population of North Carolina's Piedmont region more than doubled in the decade from 1765 to 1775. Most of the settlers who arrived during that time were European Americans traveling from the North via the Great Indian Trading Path and the Great Wagon Road.
Format: article
By Christopher E. Hendricks and J. Edwin Hendricks.
Immigrants' experiences in colonial North Carolina
In this lesson plan, students read two primary-source documents describing the experiences of new arrivals to North Carolina during the colonial period: One is a summary of a report written by a young Moravian settler from Pennsylvania; the other is a letter from a German immigrant. Students compare and contrast the journeys and settlement of the two groups.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Introduction to the Moravian diary
In Diary of a journey of Moravians, page 1
Introduction to the Moravian diary The Moravian seal, symbol of the Moravian church. The Moravians made their first settlement in America, in 1735, on the lower Savannah River, where...
Format: article
Joining together in song: Piedmont music in black and white
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 6.1
This article from Carolina Music Ways discusses musical interactions between African Americans and European Americans prior to the Civil War, including African American participation in Moravian sacred music and the contributions of black and white Americans to the string band tradition in the North Carolina Piedmont.
Format: article
North Carolina history: Grade 4 educator's guide
This educator's guide provides teaching suggestions designed to facilitate using the digital North Carolina history textbook with fourth-grade students.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New Nation
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the early national period (1790–1836). Topics include the development of state government and political parties, agriculture, the Great Revival, education, the gold rush, the growth of slavery, Cherokee Removal, and battles over internal improvements and reform.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Revolutionary North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the era of the American Revolution. Topics include the Regulators, the resistance to Great Britain, the War for Indpendence, and the creation of new governments.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Summary of a report sent to Bethlehem
In Diary of a journey of Moravians, page 16
In Colonial North Carolina, page 5.4
In 1733, a group of Moravians — a Protestant Christian denomination originating in fourteenth-century Bohemia — moved from Europe to North America seeking freedom from religious persecution. In 1753, a group of twelve single brothers left Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, for a new settlement in North Carolina. Their report back to Bethlehem describes what they found in their new home. Includes historical commentary.
Format: report
Understanding North Carolina's Moravian settlers
In this lesson plan, students read a diary written by a young Moravian man traveling from Pennsylvania to a Moravian settlement in North Carolina in 1733. Students complete a graphic organizer with details of the journey and follow the route on a map.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.