K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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Bicycles: Scourge of the streets?
In North Carolina in the New South, page 5.4
Newspaper editorials about a collision between a bicylclist and a pedestrian in Wilmington, North Carolina, 1897. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Going to the movies
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 6.12
Newspaper article about the first "talkie" shown in Wilmington, North Carolina, 1929. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
The Great Depression and World War II
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the Great Depression and World War II (1929–1945).
Format: book (multiple pages)
Hysteria in Wilmington
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 9.8
Excerpt from the diary of Moses Ashley Curtis, a Wilmington tutor. Curtis describes the response of Wilmington residents to the threat of a slave insurrection in September, 1831, after Nat Turner's Rebellion. Includes historical commentary.
Format: diary/primary source
J. Allen Kirk on the Wilmington Race Riot
In North Carolina in the New South, page 8.6
Account of the Wilmington Race Riot by the Rev. Dr. J. Allen Kirk, pastor of the Central Baptist Church. Kirk and his family hid in a graveyard from the white mob, then fled the city. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: pamphlet/primary source
Letter from an African American citizen of Wilmington to the President
In North Carolina in the New South, page 8.5
Letter to President William McKinley, describing the Wilmington Race Riot and asking him to intervene and "send relief." Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina during the Civil War and Reconstruction (1860–1876). Topics include debates over secession, battles and strategies, the war in North Carolina, the soldier's experience, the home front, freedom and civil rights for former slaves, Reconstruction, and the "redemption" of the state by conservatives.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the early 20th century
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the first decades of the twentieth century (1900–1929). Topics include changes in technology and transportation, Progressive Era reforms, World War I, women's suffrage, Jim Crow and African American life, the cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and labor unrest, and the Gastonia stirke of 1929.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New Nation
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the early national period (1790–1836). Topics include the development of state government and political parties, agriculture, the Great Revival, education, the gold rush, the growth of slavery, Cherokee Removal, and battles over internal improvements and reform.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New South
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the decades after the Civil War (1870–1900). Topics include changes in agriculture, the growth of cities and industry, the experiences of farmers and mill workers, education, cultural changes, politics and political activism, and the Wilmington Race Riot.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Postwar North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the postwar era (1945–1975).
Format: book (multiple pages)
Prisoners of war in North Carolina
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 7.8
Oral history interview with a woman who grew up in North Carolina during World War II. German prisoners of war were held in her community and sent to work on nearby farms. Includes historical background.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Recent North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore recent North Carolina (1975–present). Topics include politics, the economy, the environment, natural disasters, and increasing diversity.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Report of Vice-Consul R. E. Heide on the Resources, Trade and Commerce of North Carolina (1875)
An 1875 report on the population, geography, industry, and natural resources of North Carolina, with particular attention to shipping, navigation, and the production of naval stores.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The "Revolutionary Mayor" of Wilmington
In North Carolina in the New South, page 8.4
Account of the Wilmington Race Riot by Alfred Waddell, who had led the violence. Waddell blamed the violence on blacks and Wilmington's white Fusionist leaders, and he claimed that he had been legally elected mayor of Wilmington. Includes historical commentary.
Format: /primary source
A slave auction at Wilmington
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 2.6
Letter from a German traveler describing a slave auction in the 1780s. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Ten years later: Remembering Hurricane Floyd's wave of destruction
In Recent North Carolina, page 5.1
Retrospective article from the Wilmington Star-News recalls the impact of Hurricane Floyd on North Carolina in 1999.
Format: newspaper
Wartime Wilmington
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 7.7
Oral history interview with a native of Wilmington and World War II veteran, describing the transformation of his home town during World War II. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The Wilmington Race Riot
In North Carolina in the New South, page 8.3
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 2.8
In November 1898, on the heels of the state Democratic Party's white supremacy campaign, violence broke out in Wilmington. A white mob burned the offices of a black newspaper and killed at least twenty-five African Americans.
Format: article