K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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Resources tagged with Orange County are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

Address from inhabitants near Haw River
The request of the Inhabitants of the West side of Haw river to the Assembly men and Vestry men of Orange County Whereas the Taxes in the County are larger according to the number of Taxables than adjacent counties and continues so year after year,...
Format: petition
Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Campus protests
In Postwar North Carolina, page 7.10
Press release by the UNC-Chapel Hill student government, May 9, 1970, explaining students' strike to protest the expansion of the Vietnam War into Cambodia and the killing of protesters at Kent State University in Ohio. Includes historical background.
Format: document/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Cane Creek Reservoir
In Recent North Carolina, page 4.6
Excerpts from an oral history interview about the battle to prevent construction of a reservoir in Orange County, North Carolina, in the 1970s and 1980s. Includes historical background.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Chaos in Hillsborough
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 1.9
Contemporary newspaper report about mob violence in Hillsborough, North Carolina, in October 1770. The violence was part of a series of protests by Regulators angry with illegal fees and corrupt officials. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
The closing of a factory
In Recent North Carolina, page 3.2
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 5.8
Excerpts from two oral history interviews about the closing of the White Furniture Factory in Mebane, North Carolina, in the 1990s. Includes historical background.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Early childhood
In Postwar North Carolina, page 9.1
First part of an oral history interview with Rebecca Clark, an African American who was born in rural Orange County just before the Depression and witnessed the changes in civil rights over the years.
Format: interview
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kristin Post.
Gay life
In Postwar North Carolina, page 6.8
Interview with a gay man about his experiences living in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in the 1950s. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Howard Lee
In Postwar North Carolina, page 6.10
Howard Lee's political career began with his election as mayor of Chapel Hill in 1969. He was the first African American mayor elected in a predominantly white southern town since Reconstruction.
Format: article
Managing a plantation: Slaves
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 3.14
List of slaves on the Cameron plantation in Orange County, North Carolina, 1844. Includes historical commentary.
Format: document/primary source
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina history: Grade 4 educator's guide
This educator's guide provides teaching suggestions designed to facilitate using the digital North Carolina history textbook with fourth-grade students.
Format: (multiple pages)
Orange County inhabitants petition Governor Tryon
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 1.6
Petition from residents of Orange County, North Carolina, to Governor William Tryon, May 1768, apologizing for recent acts of violence by Regulators and asking him to address the illegal fees demanded by court officials. Includes historical commentary.
Format: petition/primary source
Pay raise
In Postwar North Carolina, page 9.5
Fifth part of an oral history interview with Rebecca Clark, an African American who was born in rural Orange County just before the Depression and witnessed the changes in civil rights over the years.
Format: interview
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kristin Post.
Perspectives on school desegregation: Fran Jackson
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.11
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 5.6
Interview with a woman who attended all-black schools in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and the town's first integrated high school, about her experiences. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Plans for democracy
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.12
Instructions to delegates from Orange County, North Carolina, to the Provinicial Congress in November 1776, about what sort of state constitution they should support. Includes historical commentary.
Format: document/primary source
Politics
In Postwar North Carolina, page 9.6
Final part of an oral history interview with Rebecca Clark, an African American who was born in rural Orange County just before the Depression and witnessed the changes in civil rights over the years.
Format: interview
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kristin Post.
Postwar North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the postwar era (1945–1975).
Format: book (multiple pages)
Race in her lifetime
In this lesson, students will use oral histories to trace the life of Rebecca Clark, an African American who was born in rural Orange County just before the Depression and witnessed the changes in civil rights over the years.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Race relations
In Postwar North Carolina, page 9.4
Fourth part of an oral history interview with Rebecca Clark, an African American who was born in rural Orange County just before the Depression and witnessed the changes in civil rights over the years.
Format: interview
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kristin Post.