K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

ATTENTION USERS

LEARN NC is no longer supported by the UNC School of Education and has been permanently archived. On February 1st, 2018, you will only be able to access these resources through the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. We recommend that you print or download resources you may need before February 1st, 2018, after which, you will have to follow these instructions in order to access those resources.

Narrow your search

Resources tagged with United States are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

Amending the U.S. Constitution
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.8
Text of the thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth amendments to the U.S. Constitution, passed after the Civil War to abolish slavery and to guarantee the civil rights of African Americans.
Format: constitution/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Andrew Jackson calls for Indian removal
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 10.3
Excerpt from President Andrew Jackson's first inaugural address, 1829, in which he argued that American Indians should be removed west of the Mississippi. Includes historical commentary.
Format: speech/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kathryn Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Articles of Confederation
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 6.2
Full text of the Articles of Confederation, which established the first national government after the American colonies declared their independence from Britain. Includes historical commentary.
Format: constitution/primary source
The Bill of Rights
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 6.7
The text of the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution, with historical commentary.
Format: constitution/primary source
The booming twenties
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 6.1
A brief history of the United States in the 1920s.
Format: article
Canning for country and community
In this lesson plan, students will use primary source documents to evaluate the technological challenges of food preservation in the 30s and 40s, compare food preservation in the first half of the twentieth century with today, and consider the political role of food in the community.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Melissa Thibault.
Cherokee Nation v. the State of Georgia, 1831
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 10.6
When Georgia tried to subject the Cherokee to state law, they sued the state in federal court. The Supreme Court ruled against them in 1831, in this decision written by Chief Justice John Marshall. Includes historical commentary.
Format: court decision/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood and David Walbert.
Civil rights protests and dilemmas
In this lesson students explore well-known civil rights protests then listen to two oral histories of individuals who protested in their own way to promote equality for African Americans. Students specifically will consider personal risks involved in protest.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Civil rights wax museum project
In this lesson plan, students will choose African Americans prominent in the Civil Rights Movement and research aspects of their lives. They will create timelines of their subjects' lives and a speech about their subjects, emphasizing why they are remembered today.
Format: lesson plan (grade 5 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Sabrina Lewandowski.
Civil War casualties
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.12
Historians estimate that about 620,000 Americans died in the Civil War -- almost as many as have died in all other U.S. wars combined. This article explains why.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Civil War uniforms
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 5.3
Article describes the clothing and baggage of northern and southern soldiers during the U.S. Civil War. Includes video of a Civil War reenactment.
Format: article
The Civil War: From Bull Run to Appomattox
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 2.3
Summary of military and political action in the U.S. Civil War, 1861–1865.
Format: article
The Cold War in the 1950s
In Postwar North Carolina, page 1.5
An overview of the Cold War during the presidency of Dwight Eisenhower, including the rise of McCarthyism.
Format: article
The Cold War: An overview
In Postwar North Carolina, page 1.1
A brief history of the Cold War between the United States and Soviet Union, 1945–1991.
Format: article
The coming of war
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 4.1
Overview of the events leading up to the United States' involvement in World War II. Includes an excerpt from a film produced by the U.S. Government to convince Americans of the need to fight.
Format: article
The Constitution of the United States
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 6.4
An original print copy of the Constitution, 1787. Page 2 of 2 of the original printed Constitution. We...
Format: constitution/primary source
The Constitution of the United States: Amendments 11-27
Amendment XI Passed by Congress March 4, 1794. Ratified February 7, 1795. The Judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against...
Format: constitution
Debating the Federal Constitution
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 6.5
Excerpt of a speech given by William Richardson Davie at the convention called in North Carolina, 1788, to consider ratification of the United States Constitution. Davie explains why the new Constitution is necessary and why it is not a threat to liberty and argues for ratification. Includes historical commentary.
Format: speech/primary source
The Declaration of Independence
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.11
Text of the Declaration of Independence with historical commentary.
Format: declaration/primary source