K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Resources tagged with World War I are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

Ashe County deserters
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.11
Speech by North Carolina Governor Thomas W. Bickett in Ashe County, 1918, convincing deserters to turn themselves in and return to service in the Army. Bickett explains his view of the rationale for the war and of citizens' duty to their country. Includes historical commentary.
Format: article/primary source
The Bonus Army
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 1.5
In 1932, in the depths of the Great Depression, thousands of World War I veterans set up camp in Washington, D.C., to lobby Congress to pay them their army bonus early. The Army dispersed them violently, and the public outcry contributed to President Hoover's failure to win reelection that year.
Format: article
Camp Bragg
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.7
This 1919 description of Fort Bragg and the process of building it during World War I was published as part of a larger book promoting Fayetteville and the surrounding area. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Conditions at Camp Greene
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.8
This speech was given by Sherman E. Burroughs, a U.S. Representative from New Hampshire. In his speech, Burroughs protested the unsanitary conditions at Camp Greene, an army camp located outside of Charlotte, North Carolina. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: speech/primary source
Diary of a doughboy
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.9
Excerpts from a diary written by Willard Newton, who served in the U.S. Army in France during World War I. Describes trench warfare and conditions along the front. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: diary/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The "flapper"
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 6.11
Contemporary description of the "flapper" and the changes in American culture in the 1920s. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: magazine/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The Great Depression and World War II
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the Great Depression and World War II (1929–1945).
Format: book (multiple pages)
The increasing power of destruction: Military technology in World War I
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.6
World War I saw the first widespread military use of the machine gun, barbed wire, land mines, airplanes, and poison gas, all of which changed the nature of warfare and military strategy.
Format: article
A letter home from the American Expeditionary Force
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.10
Letter from Robert Hanes, who was stationed in France during World War I, to his wife Mildred at home in North Carolina. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
North Carolina and the "Blue Death": The flu epidemic of 1918
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.13
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 2.9
The influenza epidemic of 1918–1919 proved deadlier to North Carolinians than the Great War itself. This article describes the effects of the epidemic and how public health officials tried to stop it.
Format: article
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the early 20th century
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the first decades of the twentieth century (1900–1929). Topics include changes in technology and transportation, Progressive Era reforms, World War I, women's suffrage, Jim Crow and African American life, the cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and labor unrest, and the Gastonia stirke of 1929.
Format: book (multiple pages)
"Over there"
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.4
Shortly after the United States entered World war I, George M. Cohan wrote the words and music to "Over There," which quickly became the anthem of American soldiers. This page includes the lyrics, original sheet music, and a 1917 recording of the song.
Format: music/primary source
Propaganda and public opinion in the First World War
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.3
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 7.6
The United States produced more propaganda posters than any other nation during World War I. A slideshow uses a small sample of these posters to highlight some of the themes of American involvement in the war.
Format: slideshow
Rescue at sea
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.12
In August 1918, the Lifesaving Service made a daring rescue of the crew of the British tanker Mirlo off the shores of Bodie Island, North Carolina.
Format: article
The Treaty of Versailles
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.15
The treaty that ended World War I took German territory, demanded reparations, redrew the map of Europe, and created a League of Nations that would prove to be ineffective.
Format: article
The United States and World War I
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.2
Article summarizes the reasons for U.S. involvement in World War I, President Wilson's role in the peace talks, and the nation's return to isolationism after the war, including the "Red Scare." A sidebar summarizes North Carolina's contributions.
Format: article
The War and German Americans
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.5
German Americans faced persecution during World War I, encouraged by President Wilson's administration. This brief article includes a recording and transcript of a 1917 speech by former U.S. ambassador to Germany James W. Gerard, vilifying German Americans.
Format: article
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
World War I propaganda posters
U.S. Government propaganda posters spelled out the reasons for American involvement in World War I and encouraged all Americans to help in the war effort.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)