K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

Narrow your search

Resources tagged with advertising are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

Advertising for slaves
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 1.10
Advertisements for sales of slaves and for runaways in the Carolina Watchman (Salisbury, North Carolina), January 7, 1837. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Advertising new products
In North Carolina in the New South, page 5.6
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 4.5
Advertisements from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries show new technologies, new tastes, and new ways of marketing goods to consumers.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
A Brief Description of the Province of Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.8
A pamphlet produced in 1660s London at the request of the Lords Proprietors described the economic opportunity and religious freedom available to settlers in Carolina. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
"Eastern North Carolina for the farmer"
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 6.3
Pamphlet published by the Atlantic Coast Line railroad in 1916, advertising eastern North Carolina as a place for people from other parts of the country to settle. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Educator's Guides: North Carolina Digital History
Best practices, process guides, worksheets, and other resources for teaching with LEARN NC's digital textbook of North Carolina history.
Format: (multiple pages)
How do I look to you?
In this lesson, students will evaluate public service posters and a grooming pamphlet to determine if and how propaganda was used to improve the health of children, and define acceptable appearances for young women in the 1930s.
Format: lesson plan (grade 6–8 English Language Arts)
By Loretta Wilson.
New machine shop in Plymouth, N.C.
In North Carolina in the New South, page 2.11
Broadside advertisement for a machine shop opening in Plymouth, North Carolina, in 1880. Includes historical commentary.
Format: advertisement/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
New Spring Goods
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 7.16
Advertisements in a Plymouth, North Carolina, newspaper in May 1865, celebrating the return of peace -- and of consumer goods from the North. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina during the Civil War and Reconstruction (1860–1876). Topics include debates over secession, battles and strategies, the war in North Carolina, the soldier's experience, the home front, freedom and civil rights for former slaves, Reconstruction, and the "redemption" of the state by conservatives.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the early 20th century
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the first decades of the twentieth century (1900–1929). Topics include changes in technology and transportation, Progressive Era reforms, World War I, women's suffrage, Jim Crow and African American life, the cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and labor unrest, and the Gastonia stirke of 1929.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New South
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the decades after the Civil War (1870–1900). Topics include changes in agriculture, the growth of cities and industry, the experiences of farmers and mill workers, education, cultural changes, politics and political activism, and the Wilmington Race Riot.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Reading guide: A Brief Description of the Province of Carolina
Reading guide designed to aid students' comprehension of a primary source document — a 17th-century pamphlet produced in London describing the economic opportunity and religious freedom available to settlers in Carolina.
Format: worksheet/lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Reading newspapers: Advertisements
In Educator's Guides: North Carolina Digital History, page 2.6
A learner's guide to reading and understanding advertisements in historical newspapers.
Format: article/learner's guide
By Kathryn Walbert.
Reading primary sources: Newspaper advertisements
This interactive guide to reading classified advertisements in a 19th-century newspaper editorial steps through layers of questions, guiding the reader through the process of historical inquiry. This edition is one in a series of guides on reading historical primary sources.
Format: newspaper (multiple pages)
Sour stomachs and galloping headaches
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 1.13
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 7.5
Excerpts from an online exhibit about the rise of "patent medicine" in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Includes several examples of packaging and advertising.
Format: exhibit/primary source
Teaching about slavery through newspaper advertisements
In this lesson for grades 8 and 11, students will analyze a selection of advertisements related to slavery from an 1837 newspaper in order to enhance their understanding of antebellum North Carolina, U.S. history, and the history of American slavery.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Kathryn Walbert.
Teaching suggestions: A Brief Description of the Province of Carolina
Teaching suggestions designed to support students' understanding of a 17th-century primary source document — a pamphlet produced in London at the request of the Lords Proprietors describing the economic opportunity and religious freedom available to settlers in Carolina.
Format: /lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.