K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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Resources tagged with antebellum are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

1835 amendments to the North Carolina Constitution
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.3
Amendments to the North Carolina state constitution passed in 1835. Includes historical commentary.
Format: constitution/primary source
Academies for boys and for girls
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.10
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 4.2
Various newspaper advertisements for academies or boarding schools in the Piedmont of North Carolina between 1838 and 1840. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Advertising for slaves
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 1.10
Advertisements for sales of slaves and for runaways in the Carolina Watchman (Salisbury, North Carolina), January 7, 1837. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
The Alamance Cotton Mill
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 4.7
In 1837, Edwin Holt founded the Alamance Cotton Mill, which began the industrial development of Alamance County. The mill produced the first colored fabrics in the South, including the popular "Alamance Plaid."
Format: article
All hail to thee, thou good old state
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 6.8
A poem by Mary Bayard Devereux Clarke, North Carolina writer and editor, written in 1854. Includes historical commentary.
Format: poetry/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Antislavery feeling in the mountains
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 1.12
In this excerpt from his book (1860), Frederick Law Olmsted describes his interactions with residents of the Appalachian region and their opinions on slavery. Includes historical commentary. Note: This source contains explicit language or content that requires mature discussion.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
The Ballad of Frankie Silver
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 6.7
Frankie Silver was hanged in Morganton in 1833 for the murder of her husband. According to legend, she sang her confession from the gallows. This version of her "ballad" was printed in a Morganton newspaper in 1884.
Format: music/primary source
A bilious fever
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 2.9
Excerpt from an 1850 novel in which the author describes the illness he succumbed to on a trip to Nag's Head. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Black codes
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 1.9
Excerpts from the North Carolina Revised Code of 1855 with respect to free and enslaved African Americans, known as the "black codes." Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood and David Walbert.
Businesses by county, 1854
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 4.3
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 9.3
In this activity, students explore an excerpt from the Southern Business Directory and General Commercial Advertiser of 1854 to learn about business and town life in antebellum North Carolina.
Format: activity
A camp meeting scene
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 3.3
Description of a typical camp meeting during the Second Great Awakening of the early nineteenth century, including preaching, conversion experiences, and the physical arrangement of the meetings.
Format: book
The Confessions of Nat Turner
The book by Thomas R. Gray, allegedly containing the prison "confession" of Nat Turner, an enslaved man who led an 1831 insurrection in Southampton, Virginia.
Format: book/primary source
Court days
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 2.8
Excerpt from an 1857 novel in which the author, a tutor from the North living in Bertie County, North Carolina, describes the people and events he saw at court days. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Criminal law and reform
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.6
In the early nineteenth century, North Carolina had more than two dozen crimes punishable by death, and the state kept a variety of physical and humiliating punishments on the books as well. Reformers tried to make the criminal code clearer and more humane, but they made little progress before the Civil War.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Diary of a farm wife
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 2.4
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 3.3
April 1854 Page from Penelope Alderman diary. Mond. 3. Wove some. Mr. A. ploughing and...
Format: diary/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Diary of a planter
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 2.3
Excerpt from the diary of Henry W. Harrington, Jr., a plantation owner in Richmond County, North Carolina. Includes historical commentary.
Format: diary/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood and David Walbert.
Distribution of land and slaves
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 1.1
In this activity, students analyze census data and maps to understand the distribution of land, wealth, and slaves in antebellum North Carolina.
Format: activity
By David Walbert.
A divided nation
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 7.5
During the 1850s, the issue of slavery severed the political bonds that had held the United States together. The rise of abolitionism, renewed conflict over the expansion of slavery into the western territories, and the Dred Scott decision all pushed the nation closer to civil war.
Format: article
Dorothea Dix Hospital
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.7
Dorothea Dix, a reformer from New England, came to North Carolina in the 1840s to campaign for a state mental hospital that would provide humane care to the mentally ill. Her efforts resulted in the construction of Dix Hill Asylum (now called Dorothea Dix Hospital) which opened in 1856.
Format: article