K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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Archaeobotany
In Intrigue of the Past, page 2.6
Students will use pictures of seeds, an activity sheet, and a graph to identify seven seeds and the conditions in which they grow. They will also infer ancient plant use by interpreting archaeobotanical samples and determine changing plant use by Native North Carolinians by interpreting a graph of seed frequency over time.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4–5 and 8 Science and Social Studies)
Archaeological context
In Intrigue of the Past, page 1.5
In their study of context, students will use a game and a discussion to demonstrate the importance of artifacts in context for learning about past people.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–4 Social Studies)
Archaeological soils
In Intrigue of the Past, page 2.11
Students will determine components of a soil sample and evaluate how archaeologists use soils to interpret sites.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Science)
Archaeology as a career
In Intrigue of the Past, page 5.2
In their study of archaeology as a career, students will read essays and complete an activity to gain an understanding of and appreciation for the career of a professional archaeologist.
Format: lesson plan (grade K–5 Guidance)
Artifact classification
In Intrigue of the Past, page 2.4
Students will use pictures of artifacts or objects from a teaching kit to classify artifacts and answer questions about the lifeways of a group of historic Native Americans.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–4 Social Studies)
Artifact ethics
In Intrigue of the Past, page 5.5
In their study of archaeological issues students will use ethical dilemmas to examine their own values and beliefs about archaeological site protection. They will also evaluate possible actions they might take regarding site and artifact protection.
Format: lesson plan (grade K–5 Guidance and Social Studies)
Chronology: The time of my life
In Intrigue of the Past, page 1.6
In their study of chronology the students will use personal timelines and an activity sheet to demonstrate the importance of intact information to achieve accuracy, and compare and contrast their timelines with the chronological information contained in a stratified archaeological site.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–5 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
Classification and attributes
In Intrigue of the Past, page 1.7
In their study of classification and attributes, students will use “doohickey kits” to classify objects based on their attributes, and explain that scientists and specifically archaeologists use classification to help answer research questions.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–4 Social Studies)
Coastal Plain cultures graphic organizer
In Two worlds: Educator's guide, page 2.5
As students read the article "Peoples of the Coastal Plain," this graphic organizer will help them develop an understanding of the cultures that existed in North Carolina's Coastal Plain hundreds of years ago.
Format: /lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Creating your own rock art
In Intrigue of the Past, page 5.4
Students will use regional rock art symbols or their own symbols to cooperatively create a rock art panel. They will also use a replica of a vandalized rock art panel to examine their feelings about rock art vandalism and discuss ways to protect rock art and other archaeological sites.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–5 Visual Arts Education and Social Studies)
Culture everywhere
In Intrigue of the Past, page 1.3
In their study of culture, students will use a chart to show the different ways that cultures meet basic human needs and recognize that archaeologists study how people from past cultures met basic needs by analyzing and interpreting the artifacts and sites that they left behind.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 and 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
Experimental archaeology: Making cordage
In Intrigue of the Past, page 2.8
Students will make cordage and use an activity sheet to experience a technique and skill that ancient Native Americans in North Carolina needed for everyday life. They will also compute the amount of time and materials that might have been required to make cordage and construct a scientific inquiry to study the contents of an archaeological site.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Visual Arts Education and Social Studies)
Gridding a site
In Intrigue of the Past, page 2.2
In their study of how to grid a site, students will use a map and the Cartesian coordinate system to establish a grid system over an archaeological site, labeling each grid unit; determine the location of artifacts within each grid unit; and construct a scientific inquiry concerning the location of artifacts on the site.
Format: lesson plan (grade 5–7 Mathematics and Social Studies)
A guided journey into the past
In Intrigue of the Past, page 5.7
In their study of archaeological resource conservation, students will use guided imagery to discover and judge an alternative way to enjoy artifacts without removing them from archaeological sites.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–4 Visual Arts Education, English Language Arts, and Social Studies)
Inference by analogy
In Intrigue of the Past, page 2.12
Students will use historical sources and an archaeological site map to infer the use or meaning of items recovered from a North Carolina Native American site based on 17th-century European settlers' accounts and illustrations. They will also describe prehistoric lifeways based on archaeological and ethnohistoric information and explain why archaeologists use ethnohistoric analogy.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
Interpreting lives through tombstone analysis
In this lesson students will take on the role of archaeologists by examining pictures of gravestones from the Built Heritage collection at North Carolina State University. They will use their knowledge of history, observation skills, and inference to draw conclusions about the lives and deaths of past North Carolina residents.
Format: lesson plan
By Loretta Wilson.
It's in the garbage
In Intrigue of the Past, page 1.9
In studying archaeological concepts, students will analyze garbage from different places demonstrate competence in applying the concepts of culture, context, classification, observation and inference, chronology and scientific inquiry.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–5 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
Language families
In Intrigue of the Past, page 4.7
Students will identify and locate the three language families of contact period North Carolina and calculate the physical area covered by each language family.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 and 7–8 Mathematics and Social Studies)
Looking at an object
In Intrigue of the Past, page 2.10
Students will analyze unfamiliar objects in order to observe the attributes of an object, infer the uses of objects; and discover how archaeologists use objects to learn about the past.
Format: lesson plan (grade 5 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
Measuring pots
In Intrigue of the Past, page 2.7
Students will use an activity sheet or modern pottery rim sherds to compute circumference from a section of a circle and construct analogies based on their own experience about possible functions of ancient or historic ceramics.
Format: lesson plan (grade 7–8 Mathematics and Social Studies)