K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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Resources tagged with business are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Belk brothers' department stores
In North Carolina in the New South, page 2.12
When Henry and John Belk opened their first department store in Charlotte in 1895, the idea of buying everything under one roof -- and always for cash, not store credit -- was new to consumers. This excerpt from the history of Belk, Inc., tells the story of Henry Belk, his first store in Monroe, and the Belk Bros. stores in downtown Charlotte.
Format: book
Black businesses in Durham
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.7
Excerpt from a 1912 article by W. E. B. Du Bois praising Durham's black business community and the tolerance of their white counterparts. Includes historical and biographical background.
Format: article/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Businesses by county, 1854
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 4.3
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 9.3
In this activity, students explore an excerpt from the Southern Business Directory and General Commercial Advertiser of 1854 to learn about business and town life in antebellum North Carolina.
Format: activity
Durham's "Black Wall Street"
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.6
In the early twentieth century, Parrish Street in Durham, North Carolina, known as "Black Walll Street," was the hub of African American business activity.
Format: article
Estimated cost of the North Carolina Rail Road, 1851
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 5.3
In this activity, students analyze an account of the cost of building the North Carolina Railroad in the 1850s and evaluate how much it cost in "today's dollars."
Format: article
By David Walbert.
The Great Depression and World War II
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the Great Depression and World War II (1929–1945).
Format: book (multiple pages)
How the twenties roared in North Carolina
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 6.2
Brief history of North Carolina during the 1920s, when growth in cities, industry, and commerce changed people's lives -- though not always for the better.
Format: article
By Elizabeth Gillespie McRae.
The impact of the telephone
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 1.5
When the telephone became widely available in the early twentieth century, it changed the way people lived and the ways businesses operated. This 1926 essay and accompanying historical commentary explain how.
Format: book
Industrialization in North Carolina
In North Carolina in the New South, page 2.3
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 2.7
Industrialization needed five things -- capital, labor, raw materials, markets, and transportation -- and in the 1870s, North Carolina had all of them. This article explains the process of industrialization in North Carolina, with maps of factory and railroad growth.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Key industries: Banking and finance
In Recent North Carolina, page 3.3
An overview of the history of the banking industry in North Carolina.
Format: article
Key industries: Biotechnology
In Recent North Carolina, page 3.4
Biotechnology is a perfect example of a "new economy" industry, a sector that did not exist as we know it a century ago but is a major economic driver for many national and regional economies today. This article gives an overview of the biotechnology industry in North Carolina.
Format: article
Key industries: Information technology
In Recent North Carolina, page 3.7
The information technology industry has grown by leaps and bounds in recent years, fueling the American economic boom of the 1990s and subsequent growth and development. This article looks at the growth of that industry in North Carolina
Format: article
Krispy Kreme
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 3.11
On July 13, 1937, the first Krispy Kreme store opened for business in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The company's success and quick rise to popularity were due both to the personal history of Vernon Rudolph, its owner, and the larger cultural history of doughnuts in America (and more specifically, the American South).
Format: article
Managing a plantation: Expenses
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 2.12
Page from an account book kept by Duncan Cameron, a wealthy North Carolina planter, listing his business with a Petersburg merchant in 1841–42. Includes historical commentary.
Format: document/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Managing a plantation: Property
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 2.13
Excerpt from the papers of Duncan Cameron, a wealthy North Carolina planter, listing property on his plantations, with notes of those that needed special attention. Includes historical commentary.
Format: document/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
New machine shop in Plymouth, N.C.
In North Carolina in the New South, page 2.11
Broadside advertisement for a machine shop opening in Plymouth, North Carolina, in 1880. Includes historical commentary.
Format: advertisement/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
New Spring Goods
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 7.16
Advertisements in a Plymouth, North Carolina, newspaper in May 1865, celebrating the return of peace -- and of consumer goods from the North. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
The Nissen Wagon Works
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 4.6
History of the Nissen Wagon Works founded in Salem, North Carolina, in 1834. North Carolinians carried goods to market in Nissen Wagons, and the works supplied wagons and gun carts to the Confederacy during the Civil War.
Format: article
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)