K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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Resources tagged with chemistry are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

Alternative energy: Where's the chemistry?
In Why does chemistry matter in my life?, page 8
In this lesson plan, students research an alternative energy source and develop a five-minute presentation to teach the class about that energy source.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Science)
By Lisa Hibler.
Atomic spectra and the Bohr model
Students view continuous spectra from incandescent and fluorescent lights and line spectra of selected elements. Students relate energy to frequency of light seen in the spectra. The presence of only certain lines in atomic spectra is related to Bohr's model of the atom. In a second experiment, students determine electron energies in the hydrogen atom.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Science)
By Lisa Bacon.
Balancing equations using matrices
In Integrating Chemistry and Algebra II, page 2
This lesson is designed to show students a practical application for matrices within the context of chemistry.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Mathematics and Science)
By Jennifer Elmo.
Black ice: A slippery arctic road
In this lesson, students investigate the effects of black carbon on arctic warming.
Format: lesson plan
By DeeDee Whitaker and Katherine Whang.Edited by Dana Haine.
Cell theory and plant respiration
In CareerStart lessons: Grade eight, page 5.4
In this lesson, students conduct an experiment using plants to gain an understanding on the effects of sunlight on cell processes.
Format: lesson plan (grade 6 and 8 Science)
By Tammy Johnson and Martha Tedrow.
Chem-speak (introduction to chemical equations)
Students will understand what constitutes a chemical reaction and how chemical equations represent chemical reactions by means of discussion and demonstrations.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Science)
By Brenda Rock.
Classification of matter
Students are introduced to the concept of different kinds of matter. Students create models of different substances to learn to identify the differences between elements, compounds, and mixtures. This lesson is developed so that teachers can use it with English as a Second Language students.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Development and Science)
By Anya Childs and Rhonda Garrett.
Confirming and visualizing Lewis dot structures
With this activity, students can calculate and visualize the atomic and molecular structures of bonds and lone pairs in the molecule methanol (methyl alcohol, CH3OH).
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Science)
By Bob Gotwals.
Critical thinking in science
This unit of inquiry-based lessons teaches eighth-grade students to utilize and develop critical thinking skills. Students will create testable questions; design and perform experiments; collect, organize, and analyze data; and use these results to decide on the next step in the scientific process.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Density
In Integrating Chemistry and Algebra II, page 3
Students will determine the density of two unknown liquids by collecting mass and volume data. Each group of students will be given a different volume of the liquids to measure, they will combine their data to create a graph. Using the graph students will determine the density of the two liquids by calculating the slope of the two lines. Students will also use a graphing calculator to determine the slope of the two lines.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 English Language Arts, Mathematics, and Science)
By Jennifer Elmo.
Density of common liquids
Each lab team will determine the density of water and one of the sample liquids. The class will then compile their information.
Format: lesson plan (grade 6 and 8 English Language Arts, Mathematics, and Science)
By Sansia Coble.
Determining the atomic mass of elements in a compound using matrices
In Integrating Chemistry and Algebra II, page 4
This lesson is designed to show students a practical application for matrices within the context of chemistry.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Mathematics and Science)
By Jennifer Elmo.
Discovering elements online
Students will work independently and in small groups to research assigned elements on the internet with sites given in advance. They will then contribute to a class database with their individual information. The database will then be made available for students to again work independently and in pairs to answer questions created from a class discussion to discover relationships about the elements.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Information Skills and Science)
By Trish Loudermilt.
Does it float? Exploring density
Density is a property of matter that requires abstract understanding from your students. This lesson plan is a hands-on lab for exploring the concepts of mass, volume, density, and their relationship. This lab achieves several 8th grade science objectives and incorporates mathematical objectives as well. The lab can easily be used as an introductory lab for the year, thus covering not only the content objectives, but also procedures for completing labs throughout the course of the year.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 English Language Arts and Science)
By Trish Loudermilt.
Electroplating: When is a penny worth less than one cent?
In CareerStart lessons: Grade eight, page 5.8
In this lesson, students understand the chemical differences between pennies made before and after 1982, and gain an understanding of the process of electroplating.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Science)
By Tammy Johnson and Martha Tedrow.
Experimenting with pH
In Critical thinking in science, page 4
This lesson introduces pH, and the effect of concentration and volume on pH. Students will use common foods for the experiment, helping them to make connections between pH, real-life things, and even the relationship between pH and taste. Students design their own experiment, which strengthens their inquiry skills.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–10 English Language Arts and Science)
By Daniell DiFrancesca.
Forensic scientists: Identifying unknown substances
In CareerStart lessons: Grade eight, page 5.10
In this lesson, students use the physical properties of three mystery substances to determine their identities. Students discuss how these skills apply to careers in forensic science.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Science)
By Tammy Johnson and Martha Tedrow.
Half-life
In Integrating Chemistry and Algebra II, page 5
This activity integrates Chemistry and Algebra II by using the concepts of half-life and exponential decay. Half-life is a way for students to see a real-life use of exponential decay functions.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Mathematics and Science)
By Jennifer Elmo.
History of atomic theory
This lesson is developed for a regular low level physical science class. In small groups, students will use media and written script to learn and teach each other about major contributions to the development of the atomic theory.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Development and Science)
By Anya Childs and Rhonda Garrett.
How do chemists measure?
In Why does chemistry matter in my life?, page 2
In this lesson, students learn about metric conversion and scientific notation by completing a lab in which they mix a gold solution with a sodium citrate solution and observe the subsequent chemical changes.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Science)
By Lisa Hibler.