K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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Resources tagged with children are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

4-H and Home Demonstration Work during World War II
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.3
During the years of World War II, North Carolina women were led by Home Demonstration and extension agents in programs to increase food production and preservation. 4-H clubs also aided the war effort, primarily through the "Food for Victory" program and the "Feed a Fighter" campaign.
Format: article
By Amy Manor.
4-H club contributions to the war effort
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.7
This page includes three reports sent by county agents of the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service after the war ended. Each county agent outlined the contributions of 4-H club members in his or her county to the war effort. Includes historical commentary.
Format: report/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
4-H mobilization for victory (1943)
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.4
In this letter to local extension agents, the North Carolina Director of Extension, J. O. Shaub, explained what 4-H clubs needed to do to mobilize youth to aid the war effort during World War II. Includes historical commentary.
Format: pamphlet/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Academies for boys and for girls
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.10
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 4.2
Various newspaper advertisements for academies or boarding schools in the Piedmont of North Carolina between 1838 and 1840. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Benjamin Wadsworth on the duties of children to their parents
In Colonial North Carolina, page 6.10
Excerpt from a book by an eighteenth-century Puritan minister about expectations for children's behavior and respect for their parents. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Child labor in North Carolina's textile mills
The photographs of Lewis Hine show the lives and work of children in North Carolina's textile mill villages in the first decades of the twentieth century.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)
Child labor laws in North Carolina
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 2.2
Excerpt of North Carolina's 1933 law regulating child labor. Includes historical background.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Ending child labor in North Carolina
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 2.1
The movement to ban child labor began in the early 1900s and slowly turned the tide of public opinion. As mill work changed in the 1920s, mills employed fewer children. North Carolina finally regulated child labor in 1933.
Format: article
Enlistment for Victory (1943)
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.5
This "Enlistment for Victory" letter was given to boys and girls as part of the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service's "Mobilization for Victory" campaign during World War II. The first part introduces the program; the second is a list of projects that kids could take on. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Families in colonial North Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 6.7
In colonial families, the father had absolute authority over his family, and wives and children were expected to do as they were told. And everyone, even young children, worked to sustain the family.
Format: article
By L. Maren Wood.
A father's advice to his sons
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 2.3
Letter from Charles Pettigrew, Tyrrell County minister and planter, to his sons. Believing himself to be dying, Pettigrew gave them his advice for living a good and Christian life. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Feed a Fighter in Forty-Four
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.6
This pamphlet was sent by the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service to 4-H members and other interested youth in the spring of 1944 as part of the ongoing "Feed a Fighter" campaign to mobilize youth to aid the war effort during World War II. Includes historical commentary.
Format: pamphlet/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
First Year at New Garden Boarding School
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.11
Memoir of a girl's experience at New Garden Boarding School (now Guilford College) in 1837. Includes historical commentary.
Format: essay/primary source
"For What Is a Mother Responsible?"
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.5
1845 newspaper editorial about a mother's responsibilities for her children's education and character. Includes historical commentary.
Format: article/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kathryn Walbert.
Graphic organizer: The well-ordered family
This activity provides a way for students to further their comprehension as they read an excerpt from a book by an eighteenth-century Puritan minister about children's duties toward their parents. Students will complete a graphic organizer and answer questions about the reading passage.
Format: chart/lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
The Great Depression and World War II
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the Great Depression and World War II (1929–1945).
Format: book (multiple pages)
Learning in colonial Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 6.8
During the late 1600s and early 1700s, education in Carolina was largely informal. Most children learned by watching and imitating parents and older community members. The sons of the wealthy were sent away to schools in other colonies or in England. The first efforts to provide formal education in Carolina were made by religious groups — the Quakers, the Baptists, and the Presbyterians.
Format: article
By Betty Dishong Renfer.
Life in the mill villages
In North Carolina in the New South, page 3.3
By 1900, more than nine-tenths of textile workers lived in villages owned by the companies that employed them. Mill villages included stores, churches, and schools, but workers found ways to avoid too much dependence on their employers.
Format: article
By James Leloudis and Kathryn Walbert.
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)