K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

Narrow your search

Resources tagged with colonization are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

An Act to Encourage the Settlement of this Country (1707)
In Colonial North Carolina, page 2.2
Passed by the provincial Assembly of Carolina in 1707, this legislation provides incentives for settlers and explains the justification for doing so. Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
The arrival of Swiss immigrants
In Colonial North Carolina, page 2.3
Although it was frowned upon in Switzerland, many Swiss citizens migrated to Carolina in the eighteenth century.
Format: article
A Brief Description of the Province of Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.8
A pamphlet produced in 1660s London at the request of the Lords Proprietors described the economic opportunity and religious freedom available to settlers in Carolina. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
The Carolina colony: Comparing three perspectives
In this lesson, students compare three different primary sources written by early colonists and consider the reasons the colonists had for moving to Carolina.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
A Declaration and Proposals of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina (1663)
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.6
Initial plans by the Lords Proprietors for settling and governing the province of Carolina. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: declaration/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Discussion questions: Expanding to the west
This set of discussion questions was designed to help students understand an article about the settlement of the Piedmont region of North Carolina between 1730 and 1775.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Disease and catastrophe
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 5.3
Of all the kinds of life exchanged when the Old and New Worlds met, lowly germs had the greatest impact. Europeans and later Africans brought smallpox and a host of other diseases with them to America, where those diseases killed as much as 90 percent of the native population of two continents. Europeans came away lucky -- with only a few tropical diseases from Africa and, probably, syphilis from the New World. In America, disease destoyed civilizations.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Educator's guide: The arrival of Swiss immigrants
Teaching suggestions to help your students synthesize the information in the article "The Arrival of Swiss Immigrants."
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Expanding to the west: Settlement of the Piedmont region, 1730 to 1775
In Colonial North Carolina, page 5.1
The population of North Carolina's Piedmont region more than doubled in the decade from 1765 to 1775. Most of the settlers who arrived during that time were European Americans traveling from the North via the Great Indian Trading Path and the Great Wagon Road.
Format: article
By J. Edwin Hendricks and Christopher E. Hendricks.
Fort Raleigh and the Lost Colony
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 4.3
England's first two settlements in the New World differed in character and purpose: The first short-lived colony, inhabited entirely by men, was set up as a stake in the newly discovered Americas and a base of privateering against French and Spanish shipping. The second was intended as a permanent colony and was settled by men, women and children. Their disappearance is a mystery that remains unsolved nearly 400 years later.
Format: article
The founding of Virginia
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.1
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 2.3
England planted its first successful North American colony at Jamestown in 1607, but settlers fought Indians and disease, and the colony grew slowly. By the end of the seventeenth century, Virginia had established tobacco as its main crop, a representative government, and slavery as a dominant system of labor.
Format: article
By L. Maren Wood.
A German immigrant writes home
In Colonial North Carolina, page 2.4
Letter (c. 1710) from a immigrant to North Carolina to his family and friends in Germany, telling about his life and experiences in Carolina and giving advice to others who might follow him. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Graphic organizer: John Lawson's assessment of the Tuscarora
This graphic organizer will aid students' comprehension as they read a primary source account detailing an English traveler's encounters with the Tuscarora Indians in 1700-1701.
Format: chart/lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Immigrants' experiences in colonial North Carolina
In this lesson plan, students read two primary-source documents describing the experiences of new arrivals to North Carolina during the colonial period: One is a summary of a report written by a young Moravian settler from Pennsylvania; the other is a letter from a German immigrant. Students compare and contrast the journeys and settlement of the two groups.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
John Lawson's assessment of the Tuscarora
In Colonial North Carolina, page 3.4
Excerpt from John Lawson's 1709 A New Voyage to Carolina discussing the sources of conflict between the Tuscarora and English settlers in North Carolina and Lawson's hopes for integrating the Tuscarora into colonial society. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
A little kingdom in Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.3
The original vision for Carolina was a feudal province in which eight "Lords Proprietors" would have nearly royal power, but with an elected assembly and guarantees of religious freedom.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Merrie olde England?
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 4.2
Many residents of Elizabethan England did not enjoy the abundance that accompanied Queen Elizabeth’s reign. The dawn of the age of exploration gripped people’s imaginations and caused many to dream of travel, and the New World offered the promise of a fresh start without the problems of the old country.
Format: article
By Charles Carlton.
Native peoples of the Chesapeake region
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 2.9
The Chesapeake Bay has been home to Native Americans for over 10,000 years. Throughout their histories — even to the present day — these societies have adapted to difficult circumstances and unforeseen changes. Chesapeake natives have faced wars, epidemic diseases, loss of land, and treaty violations.
Format: article/primary source
Navigating the inlets and havens
In this lesson plan, students read and analyze a primary source document written in the early 1700s that describes the inlets of the North Carolina coast. The students adopt the perspective of a contemporary ship's captain and discuss the importance of the information in the document.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.