K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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Avery County Historical Museum
Avery County Historical Museum
This is the Avery County Historical Museum, housed in what was formally the Avery County Jail. The museum houses artifacts and information for people interested in the county's cultural history or in genealogy. It is located in Newland, North Carolina, the...
Format: image/photograph
Blacksmith in Vietnam
Tourists and locals in Hanoi frequently escape the city by spending some time in mountain villages close to the Chinese border. Unlike Sapa, which is at a higher elevation, Bac Ha is located in a valley. It is considered less touristy than Sapa, but is well...
Format: audio
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Eating soup inside a home in Thailand
This was recorded in Trang, Thailand, a small town near the southeastern coast. During a ten-day Buddhist vegetarian festival, a young girl, Duan offers to take me to the temple. When I meet her at our appointed time, she takes me up the street to her house....
Format: audio
The forest people
In Intrigue of the Past, page 3.3
Paleoindian culture died out across North America by 8000 BC. Archaeologists say this was bound to happen. The Ice Age had ended, the megafauna were extinct, and the boreal forests faded as deciduous ones spread across the East in the warmer climate. Faced with significant environmental changes, the Native Americans adapted. Archaeologists call their way of life and the time in which they lived Archaic.
From Caledonia to Carolina: The Highland Scots
In Colonial North Carolina, page 5.5
Many Scots immigrated to North Carolina due to growing population, changing methods of farming, and the defeat of the Highland Scots by English and Scottish forces in 1746. The first organized settlement of Highland Scots was in Cumberland County, where 350 people moved to in 1739.
Format: article
By Kathryn Beach.
"Home folks and neighbor people"
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 6.4
This page is an excerpt from Horace Kephart's book Our Southern Highlanders, about the relationships between the people of the North Carolina mountains and their natural environment. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Journey to the top of the world: Climbing Mount Everest
This slideshow tells the story of a North Carolina adventurer's ascent of Mount Everest in photos, video, and text, including excerpts from his journal.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the early 20th century
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the first decades of the twentieth century (1900–1929). Topics include changes in technology and transportation, Progressive Era reforms, World War I, women's suffrage, Jim Crow and African American life, the cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and labor unrest, and the Gastonia stirke of 1929.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Olaudah Equiano remembers West Africa
In Colonial North Carolina, page 4.4
Excerpt from a book written by a freed slave in the late eighteenth century, with memories of his boyhood in Guinea. Describes the government, culture, religion, architecture, and agriculture of the region. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Shane Freeman.
Shadows of a people
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 2.3
Archaeologists divide North Carolina's prehistory -- the time before contact with Europeans -- into four periods: Paleoindian, Archaic, Woodland, and Mississippian.
Format: article
Singing Vietnamese pop song on the bus
In Vietnam, I recorded more men, women and children singing songs than in any other country I visited (twenty-one total.) Frequently, passenger buses will play popular music from the radio throughout the trip. On this overnight bus ride from Hoi An to Nha...
Format: audio
Teaching about North Carolina American Indians
This web edition is drawn from a teachers institute curriculum enrichment project on North Carolina American Indian Studies conducted by the North Carolina Humanities Council. Resources include best practices for teaching about American Indians, suggestions for curriculum integration, webliographies, and lesson plans about North Carolina American Indians.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Thai rock band, Chiang Mai
Though the music and the sound might make you think that you are in a club in the United States, this band was recorded in a club in Thailand. Western music (like rock, pop, and rap) is enjoyed all over the world. A traveler can hear it on the radio coming...
Format: audio
Vietnam rural home: Tet preparations
Tourists and locals in Hanoi frequently escape the city by spending some time in a mountain village close to the Chinese border. Sapa is a former French colonial hill station, still popular among tourists who come to experience the culture of hill-tribe villages...
Format: audio
Vietnamese family: Young girl sings
In this excerpt, I record introductions with a Vietnamese family who entertained me and a friend during Tet, or Vietnamese New Year. Some of the conversation is in Vietnamese. At first, we are getting introductions, and they are discussing names for raisins...
Format: audio
Vietnamese water puppet show- female solo
Vietnamese water puppetry is a unique folk art that originated a thousand years ago during the Ly dynasty. Villagers in the Red River delta and other rice-growing regions in Northern Vietnam staged water puppet performances to celebrate the end of the rice...
Format: audio
Vietnamese water puppet show: Finale
Vietnamese water puppetry is a unique folk art that originated a thousand years ago during the Ly dynasty. Villagers in the Red River delta and other rice-growing regions in Northern Vietnam staged water puppet performances to celebrate the end of the rice...
Format: audio
Vietnamese water puppet show: Fireworks and chorus
Vietnamese water puppetry is a unique folk art that originated a thousand years ago during the Ly dynasty. Villagers in the Red River delta and other rice-growing regions in Northern Vietnam staged water puppet performances to celebrate the end of the rice...
Format: audio
Vietnamese water puppet show: History
Vietnamese water puppetry is a unique folk art that originated a thousand years ago during the Ly dynasty. Villagers in the Red River delta and other rice-growing regions in Northern Vietnam staged water puppet performances to celebrate the end of the rice...
Format: audio