K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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A black officer in an integrated Army
In Postwar North Carolina, page 3.5
Interview with the black commander of white troops in an American battalion in occupied Germany after the U.S. military was desegregated. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Brown v. Board of Education and school desegregation
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.1
The 1955 Supreme Court decision overturned the 1890 decision in Plessy v. Ferguson, ruling that "separate educational facilities are inherently unequal" and forcing the integration of schools across the nation.
Format: article
Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas
In Brown versus Board of Education: Rhetoric and realities, page 2.5
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.2
The text of the Supreme Court's decision in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas, that the segregation of public schools was in violation of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.
Format: court decision
Brown versus Board of Education: Rhetoric and realities
In this lesson, students will listen to three oral histories that shed light on political and personal reactions toward the 1954 Supreme Court ruling Brown versus Board of Education. Includes a teacher's guide as well as the oral history audio excerpts and transcripts.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Civil rights protests and dilemmas
In this lesson students explore well-known civil rights protests then listen to two oral histories of individuals who protested in their own way to promote equality for African Americans. Students specifically will consider personal risks involved in protest.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Desegregating hospitals
In Postwar North Carolina, page 5.7
Interiew with a black dentist who joined a 1963 lawsuit against the Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital in Greensboro for refusing to accept African American patients or to hire African American doctors. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Desegregating public accommodations in Durham
In Postwar North Carolina, page 5.6
After the Freedom Rides of 1961 led to integration of interstate buses and terminals, the Civil Rights Movement moved on to "Freedom Highways" in 1962 -- campaigning to end segregation at establishments that served the traveling public. The Howard Johnson's restaurant on Chapel Hill Boulevard became a focal point in Durham.
Format: article
Desegregating the armed forces
In Postwar North Carolina, page 3.4
Although African Americans had served in the U.S. military since the American Revolution, until after World War II, they did not receive the same treatment and opportunies as white soldiers and sailors. In 1948, President Harry Truman ordered that the armed forces be desegregated.
Format: article
Desegregation pioneers
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.5
Interviews with African American women who participated in the process of school desegregation: two women who attended desegregated schools in North Carolina, and Daisy Bates, head of the Arkansas chapter of the NAACP in the 1950s. Includes historical background.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Dayna Durbin Gleaves.
The Freedom Riders
In Postwar North Carolina, page 5.5
The Supreme Court ruled in 1960 that all buses and facilities associated with interstate travel must be desegregated. But blacks who used whites-only waiting rooms and refused to give up their seats to whites faced mob violence. Their refusal either to stop or to fight back showed Americans -- many for the first time -- the hard reality of racial oppression.
Format: book
The impact of busing in Charlotte
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.9
Interviews with former white and black students in Charlotte schools about their experiences before and after desegregation. Includes historical background.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Dayna Durbin Gleaves and David Walbert.
The Little Rock Nine
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.4
When a federal court ordered the integration of schools in Little Rock, Arkansas, Governor Orval Faubus defied the order. African American students were subjected to mob violence, and President Eisenhower put the state National Guard under federal command. Faubus closed the city's high schools rather than permit desegregation.
Format: article
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
Opposition to busing
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.10
A 1974 interview with Jesse Helms in which Helms denounced his critics who believed that his opposition to forced busing was racist. Includes historical background.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Origins of the Civil Rights Movement
In Postwar North Carolina, page 3.1
An overview of the Civil Rights Movement from the end of World War II through the Civil Rights Act of 1957, including school desegregation and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.
Format: article
Perspectives on school desegregation: Fran Jackson
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.11
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 5.6
Interview with a woman who attended all-black schools in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and the town's first integrated high school, about her experiences. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Perspectives on school desegregation: Harriet Love
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.12
Interview with a woman who attended an all-black high school in Charlotte in the 1960s but whose children attended integrated schools, about the unintended effects of school desegregation. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kristin Post.
Postwar North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the postwar era (1945–1975).
Format: book (multiple pages)
School desegregation pioneers
In this lesson, students will learn about the challenges faced by the first students to desegregate Southern schools. Students will hear oral histories telling the story of desegregation pioneers from Alabama and North Carolina and critically analyze images of school desegregation. They will synthesize the information by writing a narrative from the point of view of a black student desegregating a white school.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–10 Social Studies)
By Dayna Durbin Gleaves.
Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.8
The Supreme Court's ruling in Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education, April 20, 1971, which ordered the integration of Mecklenburg County's schools. Includes historical background.
Format: court decision/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.