K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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Academies for boys and for girls
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.10
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 4.2
Various newspaper advertisements for academies or boarding schools in the Piedmont of North Carolina between 1838 and 1840. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
African American college students, 1906
In North Carolina in the New South, page 4.7
Records of pupils at the North Carolina Colored State Normal Schools (now Winston-Salem State University, Fayetteville State University, and Elizabeth City State University), 1906, with information about parents' occupations and how students paid their expenses. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
African American college students: Classroom activity
In this lesson plan, students will read a primary source document about African American college students in 1906 and answer a series of questions as they assume the role of a young African American woman in the early 20th century.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Social Studies)
By Jamie Lathan.
Archibald Murphey proposes a system of public education
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 4.6
Report of a joint legislative committee, 1817, laying out a complete plan for statewide public education, including primary schools, academies, and the University of North Carolina. Includes historical commentary.
Format: report/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Athletics
In North Carolina in the New South, page 4.9
As the urban middle and working classes grew in the late nineteenth century, so did their desire for leisure activities. The result was a growth in sports and athletics. Includes early motion pictures of school athletics.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
A Bill to Prevent All Persons from Teaching Slaves to Read or Write, the Use of Figures Excepted (1830)
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.9
Law enacted by the North Carolina General Assembly, 1830. Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The Biltmore Forest School
In North Carolina in the New South, page 4.8
The pioneering Biltmore Forest School emerged from George Vanderbilt's desire for scientific management of the forests around Biltmore Estate.
Format: article
Brown v. Board of Education and school desegregation
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.1
The 1955 Supreme Court decision overturned the 1890 decision in Plessy v. Ferguson, ruling that "separate educational facilities are inherently unequal" and forcing the integration of schools across the nation.
Format: article
Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas
In Brown versus Board of Education: Rhetoric and realities, page 2.5
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.2
The text of the Supreme Court's decision in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas, that the segregation of public schools was in violation of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.
Format: court decision
Brown versus Board of Education: Rhetoric and realities
In this lesson, students will listen to three oral histories that shed light on political and personal reactions toward the 1954 Supreme Court ruling Brown versus Board of Education. Includes a teacher's guide as well as the oral history audio excerpts and transcripts.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Charlotte Hawkins Brown
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.9
Charlotte Hawkins Brown (1883–1961) founded the Palmer Memorial Institute, a school for African Americans, and devoted her life to the improvement of the African American community's social standing.
Format: biography
Charlotte Hawkins Brown's rules for school
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.10
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 3.8
Rules for students from a book by Charlotte Hawkins Brown, founder of the Palmer Memorial Institute. Includes historical background.
Format: book/primary source
Cherokee mission schools
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.8
Description of Spring Place, a Moravian mission to the Cherokee that operated from 1801 to 1833. Describes the education received by Cherokee boys and girls for the purpose of "civilizing" them. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Colored State Normal Schools
In North Carolina in the New South, page 4.6
Excerpt from the catalog of the North Carolina Colored State Normal Schools (now Winston-Salem State University, Fayetteville State University, and Elizabeth City State University), 1906. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Desegregation pioneers
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.5
Interviews with African American women who participated in the process of school desegregation: two women who attended desegregated schools in North Carolina, and Daisy Bates, head of the Arkansas chapter of the NAACP in the 1950s. Includes historical background.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Dayna Durbin Gleaves.
Education
In Postwar North Carolina, page 9.3
Third part of an oral history interview with Rebecca Clark, an African American who was born in rural Orange County just before the Depression and witnessed the changes in civil rights over the years.
Format: interview
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kristin Post.
Education and literacy in Edgecombe County, 1810
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.4
In this 1810 letter, Jeremiah Battle of Edgecombe County describes the lack of education in eastern North Carolina and the consequences for society and politics. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The "education governor"
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 2.4
Excerpt from the inaugural address of North Carolina Governor Charles Brantley Aycock in which he talks about the importance of education. Historical commentary addresses the tensions between Aycock's views on education and his views on race.
Format: speech/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
A father's advice to his sons
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 2.3
Letter from Charles Pettigrew, Tyrrell County minister and planter, to his sons. Believing himself to be dying, Pettigrew gave them his advice for living a good and Christian life. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.